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Indiana University Bloomington

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Graduate Courses

Reader's Corner Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Spring 2015

POLS-G 599:THESIS RESEARCH (21040)

Credit Hours: 0.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (19720)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (24784)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Teaching Political Science III, Practicum (1 cr) Professor Hershey This course for Political Science and JT Program Associate Instructors concurrently teaching independent classes. Note: This course is open to Political Science and Joint Ph.D. program students only. This weekly one-hour seminar is meant to provide Associate Instructors teaching independent sections with immediate support for their teaching. Members of the seminar will gain information and exchange ideas about various teaching techniques, methods of lecturing and leading discussions, engaging students in the work of their course, assessing students' learning through a variety of types of exams and other assignments, dealing with individual students and incidents of academic misconduct, grading, recording grades, and all of the other issues that instructors face. AIs teaching independent sections are expected to attend, but the seminar is also open to AIs who anticipate teaching such a section in an upcoming semester.

POLS-Y 557:COMPAR POL: APPROACHES & ISS (27174)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bielasiak,Jacob
Day & Time: W 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 009

Course Description:
The course serves as the introductory survey in the field of comparative politics: the study of methods and concepts that are applicable to more than one country in order to test theories about politics. The seminar's purpose is to provide an overview of how such comparison is achieved, through an examination of the principal methods, approaches, and issues affecting comparative inquiry. The goal is broad familiarity across the field, rather than in-depth exposure to particular methods or modes of analysis. The first part of the course deals with issues related to the comparative method. The larger part of the course will be devoted to the study of various approaches in comparative politics. Due to the broad coverage, readings are from a wide variety of sources including book chapters, journal articles and the following texts: Henry E. Brady and David Collier, eds., Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards, 2nd ed. (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2010). Alexander L. George and Andrew Bennett, Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2005). Mark Irving Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009). Gary King, Robert O. Keohane, and Sidney Verba, Designing Social Inquiry (Princeton: Princeton UP, 1994)

POLS-Y 573:INTRO TO FORMAL POLIT THEORY (30646)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: M 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
This class is an introduction and overview of formal (aka positive or game) theory ¿ models of strategic behavior in politics, designed to investigate fundamental mechanisms that drive group decisions and outcomes, as well as generate testable predictions about human behavior. For this class, the focus will be on elements of formal theory that appear in important pieces of research in political science. The course is also designed as a prerequisite for a wide range of technical courses in the department, such as Institutional Analysis, Comparative Democratic Institutions, and Network Analysis), as well as advanced courses taught in other departments and schools at IU. The text for the course is McCarty and Mierowitz, Political Game Theory Your grade in the class will be based on (a) class performance, including preparedness, and (b) weekly problem sets. Problem sets can be worked on and submitted jointly. There is no midterm, final, or seminar paper.

POLS-Y 576:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS II (30652)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C107

Course Description:
A continuation of the graduate sequence in political science, this class begins with multivariate regression, its assumptions and violations before moving on to models of limited dependent variables (binary, count, duration, etc.), measurement models, and handling complex data structures. Emphasis will be on the interpretation and presentation of substantive results using R. Pre-requisite: PS Y575 or permission of the instructor. Students will be asked to produce an original piece of research that will be presented in a public poster session at the end of the semester.

POLS-Y 580:RES METHODS IN POLITICAL SCI (27197)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hayes,Matthew
Day & Time: W 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 009

Course Description:
Successful political science research requires many things: asking an interesting question, creating a sound research design, using appropriate methods, and writing clearly and effectively. No amount of statistical training can compensate for a poorly designed study, and even the best research design cannot generate compelling answers to an uninteresting question. This course focuses on asking interesting questions in political science and devising good research designs to answer them. Since good research requires good storytelling, there will be a heavy emphasis on writing in this course. And although this is not a quantitative (or qualitative) methods course, many of the concepts and readings require you to be conversant in the dominant methods in modern political science. The course will cover topics such as asking and answering questions in political science, defining and measuring concepts, threats to validity and reliability, and causal inference and the logic of experiments. Students will be expected to work on revising a substantial research paper over the course of the semester.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (25258)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando
Day & Time: R 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: POL ECONOMY OF DEVELOPMENT

Course Description:
Political Economy of Development This seminar addresses two general questions: How do political institutions affect economic performance? How can we analyze the interplay of politics and economics? We will examine these questions from various social science perspectives, with a particular focus on institutional and modern political economy approaches. We will also examine these questions in specific contexts related to the study of the political economy of development, including political institutions, governance and the quality of government, democracy and the rule of law, regulation, and corruption. The course is divided in four main parts. Part I lays out the foundation for subsequent parts with a review of relevant historical and economic literatures on development. Part II examines questions related to state building and political institutions. Part III applies institutional analysis to the study of economic growth and regulation. Part IV deals with special topics relevant to the study of developing countries.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (29221)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Carmines,Edward G.
Day & Time: M 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C103
Topic Title: PUBLIC OPINION

Course Description:
This course will examine the large and continually increasing research on public opinion, focusing primarily but not exclusively on public opinion in the United States. We will examine the psychological processes through which individuals form and change their political views, the substantive content of public opinion, the major determinants of public opinion including self-interest, group loyalties, and ideology, values and principles, the social context of opinion formation, the importance of opinion aggregation and the consequences of public opinion for public policy. So far as possible, we will keep the focus on public opinion, not other areas of political behavior, although the two obviously blend together in subtle and complicated ways. It has long been alleged, as Donald Kinder states, that Americans are ¿too ignorant, too intolerant, and too unsophisticated to participate wisely or even sensibly in the affairs of politics.¿ We shall examine this allegation closely and comprehensively with the aim of determining whether the opinions of the public are more a threat or a source of strength to the promise and practice of American democracy.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (20701)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Rasler,Karen A.
Day & Time: W 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 018

Course Description:
Foreign Policy Analysis This course examines a variety of theoretical explanations for how states formulate and implement their foreign policies. The theoretical and process oriented foreign policy literature will be studied from a levels-of-analysis framework. We will examine rational state actor, bureaucratic/organizational, institutional, societal and psychological models. We will also look at government decision-makers, organizations, political parties, interest groups and mass publics that have a foreign policy impact. The aim is to analyze the various constraints that influence these actors' behaviors, their interactions with one another, and the processes and mechanisms through which these actors resolve their differences and formulate policy. Although most of the readings deal with American foreign policy, most of the theories, concepts and frameworks are applicable to other countries and cultures. Hence, students are encouraged to bring comparative perspectives to bear on class readings and their research papers.

POLS-Y 673:EMPIRICAL THEORY & METHODOLOGY (31410)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Blomquist,William A.
Day & Time: R 4:45 PM - 6:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Political Theory 102

Course Description:
Institutions and the Governance of Natural Resources This seminar addresses the roles of institutional arrangements, and especially the interactions among institutions, in human efforts to govern and manage natural resources sustainably. A particular focus of the seminar in Spring 2015 will be on polycentricity. We will explore, converse, and write about the concept of polycentricity and how it is defined, operationalized, and observed in natural resource governance situations. Polycentric institutional arrangements have been a core concern of the Ostrom Workshop since its founding, and we still have plenty to do as we work on identifying, analyzing, and evaluating polycentricity at work in natural resource (as well as many other) settings. We will draw upon many readings, ranging from those that predate the Workshop to works in progress today. We will also engage several scholars from within and beyond Indiana University who have worked on, debated, applied, and critiqued the concept of polycentricity. As always in the Workshop seminar, we will actively discuss the works we read, the scholars we meet, and our own ideas and writings on the seminar topics. Students are required to write brief weekly discussion papers, a research bibliography, and a final paper that combines a literature review on the concept of polycentricity with identifying a natural resource situation to which the concept might be applied, setting forth hypotheses for future work applying the concept to that situation, and articulating a plan for pursuing that research. The paper will be presented at the Miniconference, which will be held during exam week at the end of the semester.

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (23487)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William
Day & Time: R 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Can the People Rule? Theories of Democracy This course offers a survey of the most important voices and ideas within twentieth-century democratic theory. It does so by pursuing two paths. First, we focus on a series of influential debates, which typically pitted skeptical analysts of democratic politics against those who endorsed relatively ambitious views of its prospects (e.g., John Dewey vs. Walter Lippmann; Jurgen Habermas vs. Carl Schmitt; Carole Pateman vs. Joseph Schumpeter and Robert Dahl). Second, we zero in on a number of important thematic questions: What is the "public" or "public sphere," and what is its relationship to democracy? How can democracy do justice to the challenges of pluralism or "difference"? What are democracy's necessary economic presuppositions, if any? How might globalization potentially force us to rethink existing forms of democracy? Is contemporary democracy undergoing a crisis, and if so, what might be done to counter it? In the process, students will not only gain a solid grounding in the main renditions of democratic theory (i.e., democratic realism, participatory democracy, critical theory, deliberative democracy, agonistic democracy, "free market" democracy), but also exposure to a series of major debates that remain vitally important to democracy's prospects. Although primarily a course in political theory, the topic should be of interest to all political scientists and indeed anyone else with an interest in democracy's past and future.

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (20727)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (19740)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (19741)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (19742)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (19743)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (19744)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (19745)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (19746)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (19747)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (22986)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available