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Indiana University Bloomington

Woodburn Hall facilities

Graduate Courses

Reader's Corner Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Fall 2014

POLS-G 599:THESIS RESEARCH (11359)

Credit Hours: 0.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (10608)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (16340)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 565:PUB ADM, LAW & POL: APP & ISS (17763)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: McGinnis,Michael Dean
Day & Time: R 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Political Theory 102

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 570:INTRO TO STUDY OF POLITICS (15129)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William
Day & Time: T 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 204

Course Description:
This course is the core seminar in the graduate program in political science. Its main purpose is to provide Ph.D. students with an introduction to four seemingly straightforward but foundational questions for all political scientists: What is power, and how best can we study it? What is the modern state, and how central is it to the study of politics? What is political science, and how best can we pursue it? How do political scientists go about engaging in research? To be sure, political scientists and their allies have tackled many other important issues. Nonetheless, these four have remained central to the discipline since its inception over a century ago. Presumably, they will remain so in the future as well. Students can expect to leave the course with an overview of some of the most fruitful attempts to answer them, along with basic knowledge of competing analytic and methodological approaches scholars have employed in trying to do so. They should also expect to have gained solid foundational knowledge of the discipline and its history. Hopefully, the materials discussed in the seminar will prove useful as you pursue your graduate course work and then write a dissertation. An implicit assumption underlying the organization of the seminar is that the best way to garner a sense of the strengths and weaknesses of competing approaches to political inquiry is by engaging those key questions most political scientists tackle either directly or indirectly.

POLS-Y 575:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS I (30914)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: R 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 579:QUAL METHDS IN POLITICAL RSRCH (19350)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Kasza,Gregory J.
Day & Time: T 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Geological Sciences 407

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (17667)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: MacLean,Lauren Mathews Morris
Day & Time: W 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 204
Topic Title: INDIGENOUS POL: DEM & DEV

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (31347)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy
Day & Time: R 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 204

Course Description:
European Politics: East, West, North, South This is a graduate seminar in contemporary European politics. The course will examine current issues with respect to the scholarship in five broad areas: political culture, the design of European political institutions, parties and elections, political economy and the welfare state, and public opinion and mass political behavior. The presence or absence of intra-European differences on these points will be discussed. While we traditionally have thought in terms of how politics works in the established democratic "West" compared to the emerging democracies of the post-communist "East," recent trends---including economic turmoil, Europeanization and the EU, immigration, and party system volatility---have called into question the continued relevance of East-West distinctions. Indeed, a North/South divide---one which harkens for many to the early decades of the 20th century, may be supplanting Cold War era classification devices. Class requirements include doing all the reading, contributing to class discussion, a set of short reaction pieces, and a research paper.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (33898)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Ganguly,Sumit
Day & Time: R 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: SPEA 275

Course Description:
This seminar is designed to introduce students to a large body of literature that describes and examines insurgencies and state responses to insurgent violence. Recent U.S. experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan have significantly heightened political interest in the nature of insurgencies and the challenges counterinsurgency presents. However, much of the recent avalanche of literature on counterinsurgency has focused on policy and operational issues¿the ¿lessons learned¿ phenomenon¿and less on theoretical and analytical frameworks that seek to explain the insurgency/counterinsurgency dynamic. Through the requirement of a term paper, the seminar seeks to have students formulate theoretical and analytical approaches to this topic that are less dependent on the exigencies of on-going policy crises involving the U.S. government and military.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (34471)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: O'Brien,Diana
Day & Time: M 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
This course surveys central topics in the study of women and comparative politics, covering such issues as comparative methods, political parties, elections, political representation, states and public policy, and institutions. It seeks to map the trajectory of feminist work in various areas of comparative research, drawing on examples from various world regions and time periods to analyze similarities and differences across cases around the globe.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (19436)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hayes,Matthew
Day & Time: R 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 203
Topic Title: POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Course Description:
This seminar is designed to provide students a broad overview of political psychology. In many ways, political psychology is not its own substantive area of research, but is instead an approach to understanding phenomena of both political and psychological interest. In this course, we will survey the theoretical and methodological approaches scholars have used to understand political attitudes, decisions, and behavior of citizens (and, to a lesser extent, elites). Readings for this course will rely on "classics" in the discipline, but will focus primarily on recent and emerging research trends in political psychology. Topics will include framing, priming, and media effects; political cognition and information processing; knowledge and sophistication; attitudes and belief systems; values and political tolerance; political trust; emotions; personality; and biological approaches to studying politics.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (10628)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: W 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 208
Topic Title: POL OF RACE ETHNICITY & GENDER

Course Description:
The Politics of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Identity. At its most basic, this seminar examines the role(s) of race, ethnicity, and gender in American politics. So why is "identity" in the description? Historically, the political impact of social identities has been studied through the lens of different groups in isolation (such as African-Americans or Women), or groups who share a politically formative experience (such as Immigrants). Yet each of these groups, and many more, co-exist in the political arena. A central part of this course will be to bring these literatures together and see if we can find a coherent set of themes, comparable evidence, and perhaps, shared complexity that allows us to better understand what role these identities will play in the future. In so doing, we will respect the distinctive features of the various research traditions and substantive foci that make up the body of work found in the syllabus. We will begin by distinguishing between the ways that race, ethnicity, and gender are conceptualized in the context of American politics. Using these conceptions as a base, we will then turn to modern research on public opinion, voter behavior, institutions, campaigns, and representation, examining when, where, and how these social identities influence politics. At the end of the course, we will take a closer look at intersections between these identities and reconsider the future role of identity in American politics. As we will discuss numerous unresolved questions in the literature, the end product of the course will be a 15-25 page research paper, to be completed by the student. Students will also receive feedback on their research in later weeks of the course, and present preliminary analyses in a format similar to what one would find at an academic conference.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (15131)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: M 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 205

Course Description:
This seminar provides an overview of theoretical and empirical work in International Political Economy (IPE). IPE is an interdisciplinary field -- drawing from international relations, comparative politics, economics, sociology, and other realms -- concerned with the interaction of politics and economics in the global system. In addition to providing a broad survey of the development of thought in IPE, we will explore substantive topics including the politics of trade, investment, and development. In so doing, this course will mix classic theoretical works with contemporary empirical analyses, for the purpose of laying a foundation for future research into the global political economy. Students will be expected to write a seminar paper exploring an IPE topic in some depth, as well as shorter analyses of assigned readings.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (31348)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Thompson,William R.
Day & Time: T 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 203

Course Description:
It is not clear that all types of conflict are in decline but it is clear that some types have become less common than they once were. Why these developments are taking place demand explanation. We do not lack for a number of different end-of-conflict theses. To date, macro- arguments have been made for long, nuclear, attitudinal, democratic ,Kantian, leading-power, capitalist, industrial and territorial peaces. The conclusion put forward in two long books by Gat and Pinker could be added to this list as the ¿modernization¿ and ¿psychological¿ peaces, respectively. To this list, we should add the literatures on conflict resolution and post-war settlements (domestic and interstate). All of this material purports to account for how peace breaks out. In part due to our long preoccupation with the onset of conflict, the analysis of its ending has been marginalized. That no longer is the case but just how these various arguments relate (if they do) needs to be examined. The course will focus initially on wading through first the evidence for conflict decline and then some of the explanations for these phenomena. Students will be expected to write a genuine seminar paper (on a topic related to peace processes and negotiated with the instructor) and to present their argument and findings in class toward the end of the seminar.

POLS-Y 673:EMPIRICAL THEORY & METHODOLOGY (10629)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: McGinnis,Michael Dean
Day & Time: F 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 205
Topic Title: INST ANALYSIS & DVPT: MICRO

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (12151)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hanson,Russell Lee
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Pragmatism, Secularism and Democracy In this seminar we will trace the evolution of American Pragmatism from the late 19th C. to the present. We will focus on pragmatists' conception of knowledge, their analysis of religious experience, and their commitment to a secular view of liberal democracy. Along the way we will read leading exponents of pragmatism, including Wright, Peirce, James, Dewey and related thinkers, e.g. Meade. Then we will turn to contemporary restatements of pragmatism by Bernstein, Brandom, Talisse, and especially Rorty. Critics of Rorty's secularism, including Stout, will also be engaged. Cheryl Misak's The American Pragmatists (OUP: 2013) is an excellent place to start, for those who wish to begin reading before the seminar convenes.

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (10630)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (10631)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (10632)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (10633)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (10634)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (15963)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (10635)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (10636)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (10637)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (13895)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available