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Indiana University Bloomington

Woodburn Hall facilities

Graduate Courses

Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Fall 2017

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (4041)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (11415)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (11882)

Credit Hours: 2.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Carmines,Edward G.
Day & Time: F 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (8081)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 570:INTRO TO STUDY OF POLITICS (7320)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando
Day & Time: T 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
This is a required seminar for new Political Science PhD students, which provides a foundation to develop independent research skills that are critical for a successful graduate study experience. The seminar has three main practical goals to jumpstart the professionalization of new graduate students. First, students will learn a core research toolkit to analyze and synthesize scholarly research, formulate key components of a new research project, and apply appropriate rhetorical techniques in written work and academic discussions. Second, students will learn how the discipline of political science organizes scholarly inquiry by examining its distinctive contributions within the broader realm of the social sciences. Within disciplinary boundaries, students will learn the central role of political methodology in guiding scholarly inquiries, including the importance of theory and appropriate research design for empirical studies. Students will learn a core body of substantive political research with examinations of how political scientists categorize and debate disciplinary knowledge, and how the profession organizes its work in terms of multiple subdisciplines. Finally, students will develop a professionalization plan, including demonstrated knowledge of professional ethics and academic integrity requirements, familiarity with campus and departmental requirements, and identification of personal learning goals and training needs to facilitate future planning.

POLS-Y 575:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS I (35397)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: M 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 579:QUAL METHDS IN POLITICAL RSRCH (9630)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: MacLean,Lauren Mathews Morris
Day & Time: W 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 321

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of qualitative research design, data collection, and data analysis. The seminar exposes students to a variety of qualitative research methods from a range of epistemological perspectives. The readings include general treatments of qualitative methodology as well as pieces of research that illustrate the use of these methods. In addition to the reading, students will practice these methodological techniques (e.g., conducting interviews) during class in small groups and outside of class as the basis for three short papers. The course begins with discussion of the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research, scrutinizing the ontological and epistemological assumptions underlying scientific inquiry and methodological choice. We will then examine the logic of research design, the nature of causal explanation, and the challenges of conceptualization. The course will focus on the following qualitative methods in detail: comparative historical analysis (archival research), qualitative interviewing, focus groups, ethnography and participant observation, and discourse and content analysis. We will discuss the similarities and differences between interpretivist and positivist approaches throughout the course. Special attention will be dedicated to the ethics of qualitative research and the design and implementation of field research.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (10698)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Smyth,Regina
Day & Time: W 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 009

Course Description:
Contemporary Autocracy Despite predictions that political and economic modernization would inevitably lead to the emergence of modern democratic regimes, autocracy has proved durable across a wide range of geographic, social and economic contexts. In 20th-century totalitarian systems, tyrants like Stalin, Hitler and Mao ruled through ideologies shored up by terror and persecution. In contrast, 21st century dictators such as Vladimir Putin of Russia, Viktor Orban of Hungary, Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey and Hugo Chávez of Venezuela rule(d) through elections, informal institutions, popular support, and symbolic politics with limited violence. These new autocrats adapted to an era of new media, globalization and the resurgence of capitalism to build stable non-democratic regimes. In this class, we will explore autocratic persistence in the context of the literature on regime change (from modernization to democratic consolidation), the dividing line between contemporary autocracy and democracy, the societal and elite mechanisms of autocratic regime stability, and the evolution of political and economic systems that sustain autocratic stability. The course reading will be drawn from political science journals as well as two new books: Where Did the Revolution Go? Contentious Politics and the Quality of Democracy (Della Porta) and Making Autocracy Work (Truex). While the reading and discussion will be broadly comparative, students are encouraged to focus their assignments and outside reading on their own region or country of interest. The class discussion will pay special attention to research strategies that can be successfully deployed in contemporary autocratic states.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (30419)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: O'Brien,Diana
Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 009

Course Description:
This course surveys central topics in the study of women and politics, covering such issues as women¿s participation in political parties and social movements, women as voters and candidates in political elections, women¿s policy representation, and women in democratizing states. It will draw on examples from various world regions and time periods to analyze similarities and differences across cases around the globe.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (4056)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: R 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 204

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (7322)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Loyle,Cyanne
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
State Repression and Human Rights Human rights and the study of the state violation of those rights is one of the core areas of research in political science, cutting across the fields of International Relations, Comparative Politics, and American Politics. This course presents an introduction to the study of human rights through a survey of the ways in which states violate those rights and can be prevented from doing so. The course will address the main concepts, theoretical debates, and methodological approaches that have been brought to bear on these questions. Broad themes that will guide this study include: Power and resistance to power, norms of state behavior and when and why states violate those norms, and the role of the international community in impacting domestic behavior.

POLS-Y 673:EMPIRICAL THEORY & METHODOLOGY (30467)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Alston,Lee James
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Bldg Not Assigned TBA

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (5140)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Craiutu,Aurelian
Day & Time: W 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 009

Course Description:
GOAL OF THE COURSE. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a variety of approaches and issues in political philosophy. Half of the class will be devoted to reading and commenting on primary texts such as: Plato¿s Republic, Aristotle¿s Politics, Machiavelli¿s The Prince, Hobbes¿s Leviathan, Rousseau¿s The Social Contract, and Tocqueville¿s Democracy in America. The other half focuses on the secondary literature. After examining in detail each of these classic texts, we shall explore various ways in which they have been interpreted by several main schools: contextualist (Quentin Skinner and his disciples), post-modern (Sheldon Wolin and his disciples), Straussian (Leo Strauss and his disciples), feminist (Susan M. Okin, etc.), and intellectual history (Isaiah Berlin etc.), and conceptual history (Koselleck). On a general level, this course has several pedagogical aims. First, it seeks to provide an overview of a few canonical texts and authors. Second, the course seeks to help students develop the capacity to engage in advanced textual exegesis and to critically evaluate alternative approaches and interpretive methods. There are three types of requirements for this course. I. All students will be required to choose between the following options: (a) they can write an approximately thirty-page research paper on a subject of their own choice or (b) they can write two fifteen-page seminar papers (due by mid October 11 and end of semester) on topics discussed in class. The first option involves original research, with extensive use of secondary sources. The second option involves only a minimal use of secondary sources. One of the two papers can be a review of new relevant book. II. Each student will be required to write an annotated bibliography on one author studied in class

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (4058)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (4059)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (4060)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (4061)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (4062)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (7837)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (4063)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (4064)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (4065)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (6478)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available