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Indiana University Bloomington

Woodburn Hall facilities

Graduate Courses

Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Spring 2016

POLS-G 599:THESIS RESEARCH (7671)

Credit Hours: 0.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (6457)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (11069)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (30952)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.
Day & Time: F 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (32597)

Credit Hours: 2.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hayes,Matthew
Day & Time: F 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Building & Room Number: Bldg Not Assigned TBA

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 576:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS II (14976)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 580:RES METHODS IN POLITICAL SCI (12926)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hayes,Matthew
Day & Time: T 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 118

Course Description:
This course focuses on formulating questions in political science and devising sound research designs to answer them. The course will span observational (quantitative and qualitative) and experimental research. Topics will include concept definition and measurement, threats to validity and reliability, causal inference, and quantitative and qualitative approaches to overcoming challenges in the design and analysis of research.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (32955)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bovingdon,Gardner
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Sycamore Hall 108
Topic Title: POL OF IDENT CHINA/INNER ASIA

Course Description:
Many people take terms like "Chinese," "Taiwanese," or "Kazakh" to represent straightforward concepts. This course will challenge that assumption. Battles over states and borders have powerfully affected the formation of identities in China and Inner Asia. As rulers and alliances changed, some identities emerged, some merged, and some disappeared. Through a study of theories of identity and modern state formation, combined with careful attention to the history of China and Inner Asia over the last century or so, we will examine the politics of identity in this vast region. We will explore ¿ and explode ¿ such easy associations as identity and descent, language and ethnicity, citizenship and nationality. We will also consider the intersections of nationality, ethnicity, gender, and class in various states in the modern era.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (30812)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bielasiak,Jacob
Day & Time: W 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
Comparative Democratization The seminar focuses on the contemporary third wave of democratization, and its varying democratic, hybrid and authoritarian regime outcomes. The study of democratization has been central to comparative politics, and a vast literature deals with the onset, the process, and the effects of regime change. These works incorporate political, economic, cultural, and social explanations of democratization's successes and failures. Our main task is to engage in critical thinking about the opportunities and constraints of democratic development, and authoritarian alternatives, in several regions of the world. Accordingly, the empirical evidence draws on the experiences of Southern Europe, post-communism, Latin America, Asia and Africa. The first part of the course considers what we mean by democracy and dictatorship, democratization and consolidation, and how we operationalize these concepts. We proceed to consider factors that facilitate or hinder regime transformation, e.g. issues of historical legacies, economic development, or elite commitments. Next, particular attention is paid to institutional structures, i.e. state, party systems, and civil society, to assess democratic sustainability or breakdown, and the persistence or (re) emergence of authoritarian polities. We conclude by examining issues of regime stability and change. Seminar requirements include readings from monograph classics on democracy, authoritarianism and democratization, as well as contemporary analyses in recent articles; participation and critical reviews; and a research paper on regime change.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (30941)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Ganguly,Sumit
Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Geological Sciences 407

Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to a wide swath of seminal social science literature focused on South Asia. To that end the course will deal with the following topics and more. It will examine the sources of constitutional orders in the region, questions of religion and secularism, matters of ethnic and religious conflict, the sources of political mobilization, the pathways to political development (and institutional decay), the choices of economic development and the role of civil-military relations. These topics are merely indicative of the themes and concerns of this course and do not constitute an exhaustive list of subjects that will be addressed.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (30942)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: O'Brien,Diana
Day & Time: M 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Geological Sciences 407

Course Description:
This course surveys central topics in the study of gender and politics, covering such issues as women's participation in political parties and social movements, women as voters and candidates in political elections, women's policy representation, and women in democratizing states. It will draw on examples from various world regions and time periods to analyze similarities and differences across cases around the globe.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (14149)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Carmines,Edward G.
Day & Time: M 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
Parties, Polarization and Gridlock This course focuses on one of the most important developments in recent American politics: the increasing ideological polarization between our two major parties. We will examine the possible causes, correlates, consequences, and extent of the increased partisan polarization in contemporary American politics. As part of this examination we will focus on several interrelated topics including how polarization has possibly changed our conventional understanding of American parties; how polarization affects political representation between parties and the mass public; how polarization interacts with economic inequality; whether the negative effects of polarization can be mitigated if not resolved within the American constitutional system and if so, how; and how polarization affects public policy making.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (32821)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: R 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: LEGISLATIVE POLITICS

Course Description:
This class is a graduate-level, take no prisoners survey of the contemporary literature on the U. S. Congress and legislative politics more generally. It gives a broad overview of research trajectories, critical questions, and important. It is a first step ¿ but only a first step ¿ in preparing for an American field exam or beginning a research career that focuses on legislative politics. I do not teach this class as a seminar in applied rational choice theory or as a debate between alternate theoretic approaches. Rather than debating the validity or aesthetics of assumptions and approaches, we will focus on what a piece of research tells us about how Congress (and legislatures in general) works. My yardstick is simple: a theory or hypothesis is good if it helps us learn something about congressional politics that we didn¿t already know, and is not worth spending time on otherwise. I have skewed the readings in favor of recent research, neglecting many classic pieces that anyone interested in legislative politics really needs to know. I will distribute lists of additional important and classic readings at the beginning of each class session, and will discuss how the assigned readings fit into the larger research stream. Class assignments are simple. This is a discussion class, not a lecture course, and I expect everyone to be full participants, regardless of their principle field or standing in the program. I will distribute a list of questions before each class that are intended to frame but not limit discussion. You are responsible for doing the assigned readings, writing a one-page paper on one of the questions, and coming to class prepared to be a meaningful participant in the discussion of all readings. I take the last requirement seriously ¿ saying ¿nothing made sense¿ or ¿no comment¿ is not a satisfactory response. If you can¿t make head or tail of a piece of research, you must come to class with a good sense of where your uncertainties lie. In addition to the weekly assignments, you will be responsible for preparing a ten-page research proposal that builds on, critiques, or extends one or more of the works read in the class. The proposal needs to include a brief set-up, description of a hypothesis or critical test, an oprationalization of the hypothesis or test, and a description of the data needed to test the hypothesis. Extra credit will be given to actual data analysis. The paper will be revised based on class comments and represented during the latter part of the class. There is no midterm or final exam.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (7339)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Loyle,Cyanne
Day & Time: W 1:45 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
States and their governments protect our human rights and paradoxically are the main source of the violation of those rights. This course will review and advance the existing literature on the complex and often violent relationship between state power and challenges to that power with a specific focus on when and how states choose to violate individual human rights. We will focus on the theoretical and methodological study of state repression. Topics will include non-coercive forms of repression, protest policing, civilian targeting in insurgency and other forms of rebellion, and genocide.

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (7362)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (6474)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (6475)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (6476)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (6477)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (6478)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (6479)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (6480)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (6481)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (9484)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available