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Indiana University Bloomington

Woodburn Hall facilities

Graduate Courses

Semester:

Spring 2018

POLS-G 599:THESIS RESEARCH (5212)

Credit Hours: 0.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (4245)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: McCann,Chris D

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (7932)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.
Day & Time: F 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (11563)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (11867)

Credit Hours: 2.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: F 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 561:AMERICAN POL: APPROACH & ISS (30765)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Braman,Eileen
Day & Time: T 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Sycamore Hall 022

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 573:INTRO TO FORMAL POLIT THEORY (31184)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: T 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 576:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS II (10461)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: T 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 205

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 577:TOPICS IN DATA ANALYSIS (30767)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
Topics in Data Analysis - Time Series Much that we do in political science involves change over time. What explains whether party systems will be stable or susceptible to dealignment? Do politicians respond to public opinion or are publics led by elite cues? Does the transition to a social democratic government cause unemployment levels to trend downward? Why does popular support for presidents to move over the course of the election cycle? How does the duration of wars affect the eventual prospects for peace? These are just a few of the questions which imply a dynamic understanding of social and political relationships. The objective of this course is to introduce students to a variety of techniques for specifying and estimating dynamic models. After introducing some of the concepts essential to dynamic modeling, the course begins by examining Box-Jenkins, or ARIMA modeling. We then turn to times series regression and consider how the properties of time-series modeling involve additional (diagnostic) challenges but also additional (substantive) benefits compared to cross-sectional analyses. We then will devote consecutive weeks considering vector autoregression, unit-roots and cointegration, time series models for heteroskedasticity, and time-series cross-sectional models. While we'll spend considerable time on the technical problems involved in time-series, the primary emphasis is on applied work. It is recommended that students complete the first two courses in the department statistics sequence before enrolling in this course. Student evaluations will be based on class participation and data analysis assignments.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (32909)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Yasuda,John Kojiro
Day & Time: W 10:10 AM - 12:40 PM
Building & Room Number: Sycamore Hall 002

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (34363)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Avellaneda,Claudia Nancy
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM - 8:15 PM
Building & Room Number: SPEA A201

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (11504)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bielasiak,Jacob
Day & Time: W 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
Comparative Regime Transitions The seminar focuses on the "third wave" of democratization, and its varying democratic, hybrid and authoritarian regime outcomes. The study of democratization has been central to comparative politics, and a vast literature deals the political, economic, cultural, and social factors explaining the onset, the process, and the effects of regime change. We engage this literature through critical thinking about the opportunities and constraints of democratic development, and authoritarian alternatives, in several regions of the world. First, what is meant by democracy and dictatorship, democratization and consolidation, and how do we operationalize these concepts? We proceed to consider issues that facilitate or hinder regime transformation, e.g. historical legacies, economic development, or elite commitments. Next, particular attention is paid to institutional structures, i.e. state, party systems, and civil society, to assess democratic sustainability or breakdown. We conclude by examining issues of regime stability and change. Readings are drawn from monograph classics on regime transitions, democratization, and authoritarianism, as well as contemporary analyses in recent articles. Requirements include reaction statements to the readings, an oral presentation of a weekly literature, and a research paper on regime change.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (10114)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: M 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
At its most basic, this seminar examines the role(s) of race, ethnicity, and gender in American politics. So why do we need to add "identity" to the title? Historically, the political impact of social identities has been studied through the lens of different groups in isolation (such as African-Americans or Women), or groups who share a politically formative experience (such as Immigrants). Yet each of these identities, and many more, co-exist both within the political arena and within individual Americans. A central part of this course will be to bring these literatures together and see if we can find a coherent set of themes, comparable evidence, and perhaps, shared complexity that allows us to better understand what role these identities will play in the future. In so doing, we will respect the distinctive features of the various research traditions and substantive foci that make up the body of work found in the syllabus.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (30768)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: R 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
International Political Economy This seminar provides an overview of theoretical and empirical work in International Political Economy (IPE). IPE is an interdisciplinary field -- drawing from international relations, comparative politics, economics, sociology, history and other areas -- concerned with the interaction of politics and economics in the global system. In addition to providing a broad survey of the development of thought in IPE, we will explore substantive topics including the politics of trade, investment, and development. In so doing, this course will mix classic theoretical works with contemporary empirical analyses, for the purpose of laying a foundation for future research into the global political economy. Students will be expected to write a seminar paper exploring an IPE topic in some depth, as well as shorter analyses of assigned readings.

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (13172)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 108

Course Description:
EUROPEAN POLITICAL THOUGHT FROM WEBER TO HAYEK Liberal democracy's fate once again seems somewhat uncertain, with authoritarian populism on the rise in "advanced" liberal societies, and authoritarian rivals (e.g., China, Russia) elsewhere pushing back against its once seemingly irreversible ascent. The contemporary political context invites a careful reconsideration of those "classical" works of twentieth-century European political thought devoted to a systematic analysis of modern liberal democracy, mass-based dictatorship (and "totalitarianism"), and their respective ties to capitalism and socialism. The course begins with an intense introduction to the ideas of Max Weber: we can only make sense of many of the key figures within recent political thought by understanding how they confronted Weber's imposing political and theoretical legacy. Weber's attempt to provide a defensible vision of political action amid the conditions of a "disenchanted" universe, his concern with preserving individual freedom in a world where liberal political forms seemed increasingly fragile, and his ambivalent view of modern mass democracy, provides fertile ground for analyzing the ideas of Carl Schmitt, Joseph Schumpeter, the Frankfurt School (i.e., Franz L. Neumann and Jürgen Habermas), Hans Kelsen, Leo Strauss, Isaiah Berlin, Hannah Arendt, and Friedrich Hayek. The course serves as a broad survey of recent European political thought and as an introduction to key European theoretical reflections on liberalism, democracy, and dictatorship.

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (4258)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (4932)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (4259)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (4260)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (4261)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (4262)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 757:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (33987)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Smyth,Regina
Day & Time: W 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (4263)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (4264)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (4265)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: McCann,Chris D

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (6786)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available