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Indiana University Bloomington

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Graduate Courses

Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Spring 2017

POLS-G 599:THESIS RESEARCH (8662)

Credit Hours: 0.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (7573)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (11742)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
This course for Political Science and JT Program Associate Instructors concurrently teaching independent classes. Note: This course is open to Political Science and Joint Ph.D. program students only. This weekly one-hour seminar is meant to provide Associate Instructors teaching independent sections with immediate support for their teaching. Members of the seminar will gain information and exchange ideas about various teaching techniques, methods of lecturing and leading discussions, engaging students in the work of their course, assessing students' learning through a variety of types of exams and other assignments, dealing with individual students and incidents of academic misconduct, grading, recording grades, and all of the other issues that instructors face. AIs teaching independent sections are expected to attend, but the seminar is also open to AIs who anticipate teaching such a section in an upcoming semester.

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (16419)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.
Day & Time: F 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Note: This course required for ALL POLITICAL SCIENCE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS Teaching Political Science I: Understanding and Negotiating the Teaching Environment (semester I only), 1 credit. NOTE: Y550 is for Political Science and Joint Ph.D. Program Students Only. This seminar, which is the first step in the department's Preparing Future Faculty Program, will meet five times during fall semester, on Fridays from 2:45-4 p.m. No readings are required. Students enrolling in the course (which will continue during the spring semester) will receive departmental certification in the Preparing Future Faculty Program. Topics for the five sessions during fall semester are: the nature and rules of the IU teaching environment; effective methods of leading discussions; a micro-teaching session in leading discussions; various methods of assessing students' learning and grading; and resources available for getting help with teaching. First-year students are expected to attend, but the seminar will also be open to continuing graduate students. (Note: Graduate students who are teaching independent sections during fall semester will enroll in a separate section of Y550 designed to support their immediate teaching needs. Y550 may be repeated for credit.)

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (16891)

Credit Hours: 2.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: F 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
The American Politics Workshop (APW) is a regular convening of graduate students and faculty with an interest in American politics. Meeting weekly throughout the academic year, the APW is designed to provide a forum for those conducting research on American politics to present work in progress and, in turn, learn about new and ongoing research projects in the field. APW sessions generally consist of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by 30-40 minutes of discussion. Presenters distribute their working paper or chapter in advance so that APW participants may provide informed, constructive feedback during the session. The APW also hosts lectures given by outside speakers through the Center on American Politics. APW sessions are open to any IU Bloomington-affiliated graduate student or faculty member, but Political Science Ph.D. students may also receive course credit for formal participation in the APW. Students in any year of the program with an interest in American politics are strongly encouraged to enroll in this 1-unit course. Please contact Faculty Coordinator Bernard Fraga for more information, or to sign up for the APW listserv.

POLS-Y 557:COMPAR POL: APPROACHES & ISS (30922)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bielasiak,Jacob
Day & Time: M 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 203

Course Description:
The course serves as the introductory survey in the field of comparative politics: the study of concepts and methods that are applicable to more than one country in order to test theories about politics. The seminar's purpose is to provide an overview of how such comparison is achieved, through an examination of the principal methods, approaches, and issues affecting comparative inquiry. The goal is broad familiarity across the field, rather than in-depth knowledge of particular issues or modes of analysis. The first part of the course deals with contending paradigms and comparative methods used to analyze and explain comparative politics. The larger part of the course will be devoted to the study of various approaches in comparative politics, i.e. decisions about the most significant units of analysis in the study of politics, e.g. groups, individuals, institutions, cultures, or states. The final part of the course will involve an evaluation of the comparative politics field. Requirements include participation in class discussion, and four short papers focusing on methodological questions in comparative politics; a comparison of different approaches; the formulation of a research program based on an issue relevant to your interests; and an assessment of the current "best practices" in the comparative politics subfield.

POLS-Y 569:INTL RELNS: APPROACHES & ISS (30978)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Thompson,William R.
Day & Time: W 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 118

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 576:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS II (14711)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: T 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (16315)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy
Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C103

Course Description:
This seminar surveys of classic and contemporary scholarship in the broad field of comparative political behavior of citizens and elites. Though many theories of voting come out of the literature in American politics, we will ask to what extent these theories travel to other contexts. How do institutional, historical, and cultural differences alter or upset conventional understandings of mass and elite political behavior? We will survey several topics, including attitude formation, democratic legitimacy and trust; social movements, political protest, and other forms of politics outside the ballot box; the decision to vote and why some individuals and societies turnout more than others; the sources and influences of partisan attachments; and, of course, the course will examine the foundational act of the democratic process, the vote. In addition, we also will survey recent work on two related issues: the structure of citizens' policy preferences and the extent to which political elites¿ behavior is motivated in response to these preferences or by other factors. Applications will be taken from all regions of the world. This course should be of interest to students in political science (comparative politics and American politics), sociology, and international studies.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (16411)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: MacLean,Lauren Mathews Morris
Day & Time: W 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 118

Course Description:
This course examines the topic of the political economy of development quite broadly. Throughout the course, we will be critically examining how various societies balance the goals of economic development with the desire for equality and social justice. The class begins with a critical examination of how various groups, communities and individuals contest the conceptualization of the very goals of development. We then will analyze the key changes in the paradigms of development over time. The next section of the course will focus on the changing international political economy, examining relatively briefly the literature on globalization, neoliberalism, debt and foreign aid. At this point, the course will look at the ways that advanced industrialized countries have pursued development, particularly focusing on the rise (and fall?) of the welfare state in the U.S. and Western Europe after WWII. The subsequent section analyzes the challenges faced by developing countries over time, again particularly focusing on the patterns of development since WW II. The final section of the course highlights certain themes that are essential for understanding development in both the advanced industrialized and developing world. For example, we will explore how considerations of local participation, gender, and environmental sustainability shape development initiatives. We will also have a special focus on several policy areas including health and energy policy. While paying more attention to the developing world, a substantial amount of the reading will focus on or be relevant for the study of the advanced industrialized countries. For this topic, it is quite valuable and important to read comparatively and to have seminar participants with interests in many corners of the world. It is also important to note that this course does not assume any prior knowledge of economics or political economy. It is a graduate-level introduction to what are arguably some of the most important questions for the discipline of political science and for our societies in general. The reading is multidisciplinary, drawing on key theoretical debates and discussions in political science, development economics, sociology, anthropology, history, geography, etc. The course will require participating actively in discussions; serving at least once as a discussion facilitator; completing five short "article briefs"; and a seminar paper. The specific format of the seminar paper is flexible but will be agreed upon after discussion with the professor of the student¿s particular goals. NB: This course is only offered once every three years.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (14252)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: R 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C103

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (8352)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: R 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C103

Course Description:
International Political Economy This seminar provides an overview of theoretical and empirical work in International Political Economy (IPE). IPE is an interdisciplinary field -- drawing from international relations, comparative politics, economics, sociology, history and other areas -- concerned with the interaction of politics and economics in the global system. In addition to providing a broad survey of the development of thought in IPE, we will explore substantive topics including the politics of trade, investment, and development. In so doing, this course will mix classic theoretical works with contemporary empirical analyses, for the purpose of laying a foundation for future research into the global political economy. Students will be expected to write a seminar paper exploring an IPE topic in some depth, as well as shorter analyses of assigned readings.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (34102)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Liff,Adam Phail
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Student Building (Frances Morg 230

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (30924)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Isaac,Jeffrey C.
Day & Time: W 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C103

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (8374)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (7589)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (7590)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (7591)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (7592)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (7593)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (7594)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (7595)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (7596)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (10344)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available