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Indiana University Bloomington

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Graduate Courses

Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Fall 2016

POLS-G 599:THESIS RESEARCH (6215)

Credit Hours: 0.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (5657)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (10266)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
This course for Political Science and JT Program Associate Instructors concurrently teaching independent classes. Note: This course is open to Political Science and Joint Ph.D. program students only. This weekly one-hour seminar is meant to provide Associate Instructors teaching independent sections with immediate support for their teaching. Members of the seminar will gain information and exchange ideas about various teaching techniques, methods of lecturing and leading discussions, engaging students in the work of their course, assessing students' learning through a variety of types of exams and other assignments, dealing with individual students and incidents of academic misconduct, grading, recording grades, and all of the other issues that instructors face. AIs teaching independent sections are expected to attend, but the seminar is also open to AIs who anticipate teaching such a section in an upcoming semester.

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (14437)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Note: This course required for ALL POLITICAL SCIENCE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS Teaching Political Science I: Understanding and Negotiating the Teaching Environment (semester I only), 1 credit. NOTE: Y550 is for Political Science and Joint Ph.D. Program Students Only. This seminar, which is the first step in the department's Preparing Future Faculty Program, will meet five times during fall semester, on Fridays from 2:45-4 p.m. No readings are required. Students enrolling in the course (which will continue during the spring semester) will receive departmental certification in the Preparing Future Faculty Program. Topics for the five sessions during fall semester are: the nature and rules of the IU teaching environment; effective methods of leading discussions; a micro-teaching session in leading discussions; various methods of assessing students' learning and grading; and resources available for getting help with teaching. First-year students are expected to attend, but the seminar will also be open to continuing graduate students. (Note: Graduate students who are teaching independent sections during fall semester will enroll in a separate section of Y550 designed to support their immediate teaching needs. Y550 may be repeated for credit.)

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (15195)

Credit Hours: 2.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: F 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
The American Politics Workshop (APW) is a regular convening of graduate students and faculty with an interest in American politics. Meeting weekly throughout the academic year, the APW is designed to provide a forum for those conducting research on American politics to present work in progress and, in turn, learn about new and ongoing research projects in the field. APW sessions generally consist of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by 30-40 minutes of discussion. Presenters distribute their working paper or chapter in advance so that APW participants may provide informed, constructive feedback during the session. The APW also hosts lectures given by outside speakers through the Center on American Politics. APW sessions are open to any IU Bloomington-affiliated graduate student or faculty member, but Political Science Ph.D. students may also receive course credit for formal participation in the APW. Students in any year of the program with an interest in American politics are strongly encouraged to enroll in this 1-unit course. Please contact Faculty Coordinator Bernard Fraga for more information, or to sign up for the APW listserv.

POLS-Y 565:PUB ADM, LAW & POL: APP & ISS (30436)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Nicholson-Crotty,Jill
Day & Time: R 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: SPEA 270

Course Description:
This course provides an institutional approach to the policymaking process and policy theory. It will help you to understand the ways in which governments learn of, interpret, and respond to public problems. Most importantly, it will expose you to a wide variety of ways in which scholars attempt to understand the policy process and its outcomes, and to explain the behavior of policymakers. We will explore the various government institutions that are involved in policymaking, the theories of the policy process, and the most current quantitative research testing these theories. The course is focused most on policy theory within the context of American governmental institutions and we will study the process at the federal, state, and local levels. These different levels of the U.S. federal system, and the mechanisms of the policy process within them, are obviously distinct in important ways. However, the theories, concepts, and examples from each are also applicable in important ways to policymaking in the other two. They are also, in some cases applicable to policy making in other Democratic systems and we will draw those comparisons and contrasts whenever possible and include readings where appropriate.

POLS-Y 570:INTRO TO STUDY OF POLITICS (9297)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando
Day & Time: W 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 141

Course Description:
This is a required seminar for new Political Science PhD students, which provides a foundation to develop independent research skills that are critical for a successful graduate study experience. The seminar has three main practical goals to jump-start the professionalization of new graduate students. First, students will learn a core research toolkit to analyze and synthesize scholarly research, formulate key components of a new research project, and apply appropriate rhetorical techniques in written work and academic discussions. Second, students will learn how the discipline of political science organizes scholarly inquiry by examining its distinctive contributions within the broader realm of the social sciences. Within disciplinary boundaries, students will learn the central role of political methodology in guiding scholarly inquiries, including the importance of theory and appropriate research design for empirical studies. Students will learn a core body of substantive political research with examinations of how political scientists categorize and debate disciplinary knowledge, and how the profession organizes its work in terms of multiple sub-disciplines. Finally, students will develop a professionalization plan, including demonstrated knowledge of professional ethics and academic integrity requirements, familiarity with campus and departmental requirements, and identification of personal learning goals and training needs to facilitate future planning.

POLS-Y 575:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS I (12744)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: R 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 114

Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to statistical inference with an emphasis on simulation, programming in R and producing replicable research. Students will be able to produce computational algorithms for analysis of social science data. This class should impart a set of skills that are crucial for understanding current quantitative research and enable graduate students to begin producing empirical research. Topics will include: descriptive and summary statistics, probability theory, classical tests of hypotheses (T, Z and Chi-Squared tests), correlation, regression and Monte Carlo simulation.

POLS-Y 579:QUAL METHDS IN POLITICAL RSRCH (12006)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: MacLean,Lauren Mathews Morris
Day & Time: W 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C103

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of qualitative research design, data collection, and data analysis. The seminar exposes students to a variety of qualitative research methods from a range of epistemological perspectives. The readings include general treatments of qualitative methodology as well as pieces of research that illustrate the use of these methods. In addition to the reading, students will practice these methodological techniques (e.g., conducting interviews) during class in small groups and outside of class as the basis for three short papers. The course begins with discussion of the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research, scrutinizing the ontological and epistemological assumptions underlying scientific inquiry and methodological choice. We will then examine the logic of research design, the nature of causal explanation, and the challenges of conceptualization. The course will focus on the following qualitative methods in detail: comparative historical analysis, qualitative interviewing, focus groups, ethnography and participant observation, and discourse/content analysis. We will discuss the similarities and differences between interpretivist and positivist qualitative approaches throughout the course. Special attention will be dedicated to the ethics of qualitative research and the design and implementation of field research. This course will be valuable for graduate students in political science, public policy, and other social sciences who are considering using qualitative methods in their research. The course also welcomes graduate students who are seeking an introduction to qualitative methods in order to be able to read, digest, and evaluate scholarship using them.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (13314)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Smyth,Regina
Day & Time: M 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 009

Course Description:
Scholars characterize the 1989 Communist revolutions as ¿social revolutions¿ that upended the economic, social and political organizations that ordered individual behavior for decades. The collapse of the Soviet Union produced widespread optimism that Communist authoritarian regimes would give way to stable democracies across the successor states. In reality, post-Communist political development has been uneven and ambiguous providing a natural laboratory to explore theories of regime change and regime stability. This course will examine the outcomes of the post-Communist transitions through the lens of a number of critical debates: the rise of competitive authoritarianism, the nature of contemporary autocracy, voting behavior and party formation, protest movements, theories of information control and symbolic politics, the importance of political legacies, and the sources and impact of social conflict. These inquiries¿both theoretic and empirical¿have led to significant insight about regime transition. While the empirical focus of the course is the post-Communist world, the theoretic debates will be drawn from the broader comparative literature and students focusing on other regions will be encouraged to bring work specific to their country or region into the discussion and even into the reading. We will also use this literature to explore critical topics and debates in the comparative method: the role of area studies, the relative strengths of qualitative and quantitative research, the utility of competing approaches to the study of comparative politics¿rational choice, structural, behavioral and cultural. The reading will include important new books in the field as well as articles from both policy and disciplinary journals. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, a book review, short papers, and a final project that can be tailored to the students¿ individual goals (research design, mock prelim exam, or grant proposal for PhD candidates or policy memos or MA paper literature review for MA Students).

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (33276)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Sinno,Abdulkader
Day & Time: T 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Researching Immigration and Western Muslim minorities This course introduces you to the literature and methods for researching the politics of/surrounding Western Muslim minorities. Individuals who practice the religion or who belong to ethnic groups that are traditionally Muslim are now estimated to make some 2% of the North American population and 5% of the European Union's population, and their numbers are expected to continue to grow. The attacks of September 11, 2001 and the wars that followed highlighted and amplified the role and perception of Muslim minorities in the West as political actors and electoral constituencies, subjects of cultural hostility, scapegoats for poor economic performance, suspects in the face of insecurity whose rights could be exceptionally curtailed, and agents for the projection of geopolitical power. Western states and their rapidly growing Muslim populations are adjusting to each other under the constant pressure of exogenous shocks. The way they manage the process will deeply affect Western polities and their relations with the Muslim world. Substantive topics we will explore include: How/why do different states strike a balance between security and civil rights/liberties? Is there really a tradeoff between the two? What shapes public attitudes towards (Muslim) immigration? How do institutions affect relations among the state, natives and Muslim minorities? How do Western publics see (Muslim) minorities in the context of the use of welfare benefits? How do they deal with immigration, both permitted and unregulated? What factors affect the degree of political participation by Western Muslims? Why are culture clashes more salient in some countries than in others? Why do Muslim immigrants prosper more economically in North America than in Europe? How do international conflicts affect the relationship between Western states and their Muslim citizens and the dynamics among citizens of different backgrounds? What is Islamophobia? Is there a connection between Islamophobia and anti-Semitism in the West? Are we witnessing the birth of a Western Muslim macro-ethnicity or many disjointed ethnic communities? How do Western Muslims perceive their fellow citizens? How do they mobilize politically? What factors affect the quality and quantity of their representation in politics? How do politics affect Muslim communities and individuals? What will the future hold? We will also discuss the application of research methods such as interviews, field research, experiments, institutional analysis, and survey analysis to produce convincing answers to these research questions. Of course, many of the skills and substantive issues we explore are relevant to understanding the political dynamics surrounding other minorities in the West.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (5675)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: T 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 118

Course Description:
Electoral Politics and Political Participation This seminar examines American electoral politics and political participation, covering the decision to vote, the determinants of vote choice, and the relationship between individual behavior and election outcomes. We will begin by addressing various theoretical frameworks that help us understand the decisions that voters (and non-voters) make, but the bulk of the assigned readings will explore contemporary survey, observational, and experimental analyses of electoral behavior. We will also explore how recent work on elections challenges our understandings of both the canonical literature on elections and politics more broadly. As we will discuss what questions remain unresolved in the literature, and the ways in which novel data can help us understand political behavior better, the end product of the course will be a 15-25 page empirical research paper, to be completed by the student. Students will also receive feedback on their research in later weeks of the course, as they present their preliminary analyses in a format similar to what one would find at a major conference.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (9299)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Rasler,Karen A.
Day & Time: T 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 203

Course Description:
This course analyzes the major theories of the origins and characteristics of collective dissent within polities - riots, protest cycles, civil wars, revolutions, ethnic strife and terrorism. We will also be interested in politically contentious events (i.e., strikes, demonstrations, and other social movement mobilizations) that have the potential for but do not always produce violence. The reading list surveys the major developments and debates in the area although it is not comprehensive. This topic has a strong interdisciplinary focus that combines the recent works in political science, sociology and economics. (NOTE: This course can be counted as an international relations OR a comparative politics seminar.)

POLS-Y 673:EMPIRICAL THEORY & METHODOLOGY (5676)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Alston,Lee James
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Bldg Not Assigned TBA
Topic Title: INST ANALYSIS & DVPT: MICRO

Course Description:
The basis of the Institutional Analysis is that formal institutions, e.g., laws, and informal institutions, e.g. norms, are important determinants of individual and group behavior. Behavior, including contracts, affects socio-economic development. In the first part of the course our initial focus is to take institutions as exogenous and understand how institutions lead to different socio-economic paths of development. After understanding the grand forces at play in shaping development paths, we will explore at a more micro level the outcomes of institutions, e.g. the rights that individuals and groups have to resources (property rights); and the forms of organization of production and exchange (markets and contracts). In Part II of the course we will examine the determinants of institutions, e.g. the political and social forces that change institutions. We will utilize case studies as well as econometric evidence in both Parts I and II to aid students in understanding how to engage in applied work in institutional analysis.

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (6867)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hanson,Russell Lee
Day & Time: T 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Liberalism is a family of political philosophies that resemble each other in certain respects, and differ quite widely in others. In this seminar we will examine different branches of this family, as represented by German, French, and Anglo-American philosophers (the latter category including representatives of British, Canadian, and American liberalism). We will also consider the development of liberalism over time in different cultures, noting points of convergence and divergence on the tenets of liberalism. We will briefly survey some of the practical expressions of liberalism, and assess its suitability for multicultural and deeply divided societies, too. The result will be a fuller understanding of the rich genealogy of liberalism, and perhaps a better appreciation of how this family came to dominate political philosophy in our time, as well as the limitations of liberalism in practice. Finally, and at a more abstract level, the seminar will serve as an introduction to the emerging field of comparative political theory, although the field of comparison is limited to the Western horizon.

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (5677)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (5678)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (5679)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (5680)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (5681)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (9995)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (5682)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (5683)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (5684)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Razo,Armando

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (8361)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available