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Indiana University Bloomington

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Graduate Courses

Reader's Corner Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Fall 2015

POLS-G 599:THESIS RESEARCH (6668)

Credit Hours: 0.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (5994)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (11112)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
This course for Political Science and JT Program Associate Instructors concurrently teaching independent classes. Note: This course is open to Political Science and Joint Ph.D. program students only. This weekly one-hour seminar is meant to provide Associate Instructors teaching independent sections with immediate support for their teaching. Members of the seminar will gain information and exchange ideas about various teaching techniques, methods of lecturing and leading discussions, engaging students in the work of their course, assessing students' learning through a variety of types of exams and other assignments, dealing with individual students and incidents of academic misconduct, grading, recording grades, and all of the other issues that instructors face. AIs teaching independent sections are expected to attend, but the seminar is also open to AIs who anticipate teaching such a section in an upcoming semester.

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (31416)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Note: This course required for ALL POLITICAL SCIENCE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS Teaching Political Science I: Understanding and Negotiating the Teaching Environment (semester I only) Date and time to be arranged by participants; 1 credit NOTE: Y550 for Political Science and Joint Ph.D. Program Students Only This seminar, which is the first step in the department's Preparing Future Faculty Program, will meet five times during fall semester, at a mutually convenient time (TBA) during the second week of classes and bi-weekly after that. No readings are required. Students enrolling in the course (which will continue during the spring semester) will receive departmental certification in the Preparing Future Faculty Program. Topics for the five sessions during fall semester are: the nature and rules of the IU teaching environment; effective methods of leading discussions; a micro-teaching session in leading discussions; various methods of assessing students' learning and grading; and resources available for getting help with teaching. First-year students are expected to attend, but the seminar will also be open to continuing graduate students. (Note: Graduate students who are teaching independent sections during fall semester will enroll in a separate section of Y550 designed to support their immediate teaching needs. Y550 may be repeated for credit.)

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (34987)

Credit Hours: 2.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hayes,Matthew
Day & Time: F 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 333

Course Description:
Students enrolled in this workshop will be expected to attend a number of talks given by visiting faculty members, current graduate students, as well as members of our own faculty in American politics. These talks will typically occur on Fridays during the scheduled class meeting time, but talks may occur at other times on Fridays depending on scheduling of talks. In addition to attending these talks, students will be expected to present either in the Fall or Spring as well as write up to 3 brief critiques of talks in the workshop. No external readings are required.

POLS-Y 561:AMERICAN POL: APPROACH & ISS (33434)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Braman,Eileen
Day & Time: W 12:15 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
In this graduate seminar we explore classic and current research in political science involving American politics. Because this is a very large area of the discipline, we are reading a selection of studies designed to give students a solid grounding in foundational thinking and approaches to understanding citizen behavior and institutions of government; we will also read more recent work that challenges and builds from cornerstone studies to get an idea of the important questions scholars in the field are investigating today. The course will cover ground related to how people think about and evaluate government actors and how they act with regard to their political surroundings. We will analyze research on the design, operation and efficiency of state institutions considering the normative and practical implications of this knowledge. Does our political system fulfill lofty democratic ideals in light of real world constraints? What can be done to improve the link between citizen expectations and government outputs? Students will develop their capacity to critically analyze individual scholarly work and place that work in a broader theoretical framework through readings, class discussion and written assignments. They should also come away with a very general idea of "what we know" in the field and what questions still need to be addressed (or addressed differently) to help them consider the direction of their own primary research.

POLS-Y 565:PUB ADM, LAW & POL: APP & ISS (12234)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: McGinnis,Michael Dean
Day & Time: R 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
This seminar introduces graduate students to alternative theoretical perspectives in the scholarly study of public policy. It is primarily designed for students in the Joint Ph.D. program in Public Policy (jointly offered by Political Science and SPEA), Public Policy (Political Science) or Public Affairs (SPEA), but students from other programs are welcome as well. Indeed, in past semesters students from several programs have enrolled, which greatly adds to the breadth of our discussion. We will examine the policy stages heuristic, incrementalism, policy networks, advocacy coalitions, punctuated equilibrium, public choice, network governance, policy diffusion, discourse analysis, and new institutionalisms of the economic, sociological, and historical varieties. Most readings will be analytical or conceptual in focus, but along the way students will get exposed to the details of a few areas of substantive policy. Students will be asked to submit a few memos reacting to assigned readings and a longer paper that demonstrates how the general concepts and frameworks covered in class can be used to better understand an area of policy directly related to their own research interests. All assigned journal articles and other papers will be available in electronic format, except for the required textbooks, which tentatively include Paul A. Sabatier and Christopher Weible, eds. Theories of the Policy Process, 3rd edition, 2014; Kevin B. Smith and Christopher W. Larimer, The Public Policy Theory Primer, 2nd edition, 2013, Paul Nollette, Federalism on Trial: State Attorneys General and National Policymaking in Contemporary America, 2015, and Suzanne Mettler, The Submerged State: How Invisible Government Policies Undermine American Democracy, 2011.

POLS-Y 569:INTL RELNS: APPROACHES & ISS (30958)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Thompson,William R.
Day & Time: M 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C103

Course Description:
This course will attempt to provide a reasonably comprehensive survey of the study of world politics. Nonetheless, four things should be kept in mind. First, in one semester, it is possible to only scratch the surface of what is a complex and extensive literature. Second, since this course is taught in conjunction with other seminars an effort has been made to reduce overlap and redundancy. Third, any introductory course on IR theory inevitably will be structured by the instructor's biases. Some topics and levels of analysis will receive emphasis here that might well be slighted by other instructors. A number of topics, equally inevitably, will simply be ignored. Finally, an exposure to the nooks and crannies of a subfield should help sensitize students to the virtues and liabilities of various approaches and analyses. Never assume that what you are asked to read is regarded as an exemplar of out-standing research. You are better off assuming the opposite. Ultimately, you must make up your own mind for that is what such a course is all about.

POLS-Y 570:INTRO TO STUDY OF POLITICS (10051)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William
Day & Time: T 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 137

Course Description:
This course is the core seminar in the graduate program in political science. Its main purpose is to provide Ph.D. students with an introduction to four seemingly straightforward but foundational questions for all political scientists: What is power, and how best can we study it? What is the modern state, and how central is it to the study of politics? What is political science, and how best can we pursue it? How do political scientists go about engaging in research? To be sure, political scientists and their allies have tackled many other important issues. Nonetheless, these four have remained central to the discipline since its inception over a century ago. Presumably, they will remain so in the future as well. Students can expect to leave the course with an overview of some of the most fruitful attempts to answer them, along with basic knowledge of competing analytic and methodological approaches scholars have employed in trying to do so. They should also expect to have gained solid foundational knowledge of the discipline and its history. Hopefully, the materials discussed in the seminar will prove useful as you pursue your graduate course work and then write a dissertation. An implicit assumption underlying the organization of the seminar is that the best way to garner a sense of the strengths and weaknesses of competing approaches to political inquiry is by engaging those key questions most political scientists tackle either directly or indirectly.

POLS-Y 575:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS I (14464)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: R 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Wells Library 851

Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to statistical inference with an emphasis on simulation, programming in R and producing replicable research. Students will be able to produce computational algorithms for analysis of social science data. This class should impart a set of skills that are crucial for understanding current quantitative research and enable graduate students to begin producing empirical research. Topics will include: descriptive and summary statistics, probability theory, classical tests of hypotheses (T, Z and Chi-Squared tests), correlation, regression and Monte Carlo simulation.

POLS-Y 577:TOPICS IN DATA ANALYSIS (33431)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy
Day & Time: M 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: TIME SERIES ANALYSIS

Course Description:
Much that we do in political science involves change over time. What explains whether party systems will be stable or susceptible to dealignment? Do politicians respond to public opinion or are publics led by elite cues? Does the transition to a social democratic government cause unemployment levels to trend downward? Why does popular support for presidents to move over the course of the election cycle? How does the duration of wars affect the eventual prospects for peace? These are just a few of the questions which imply a dynamic understanding of social and political relationships. The objective of this course is to introduce students to a variety of techniques for specifying and estimating dynamic models. After introducing some of the concepts essential to dynamic modeling, the course begins by examining Box-Jenkins, or ARIMA modeling. We then turn to times series regression and consider how the properties of time-series modeling involve additional (diagnostic) challenges but also additional (substantive) benefits compared to cross-sectional analyses. We then will devote consecutive weeks considering vector autoregression, unit-roots and cointegration, time series models for heteroskedasticity, pooled cross-sectional time series, and duration/event-history analysis. While we¿ll spend considerable time on the technical problems involved in time-series, the primary emphasis is on applied work. It is recommended that students complete the first two courses in the department statistics sequence before enrolling in this course. Student evaluations will be based on class participation and data analysis assignments.

POLS-Y 579:QUAL METHDS IN POLITICAL RSRCH (13260)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: MacLean,Lauren Mathews Morris
Day & Time: W 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C101

Course Description:
This course trains students in the use of a variety of qualitative research methods. The readings include general treatments of qualitative methods, pieces of research that illustrate the use of these methods, and several practicum exercises in which students will employ the methods themselves (e.g., conducting interviews). The course begins with discussion of the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research, scrutinizing the ontological and epistemological assumptions underlying scientific inquiry and methodological choice. We will examine the following qualitative methods in detail: small-n/case study research, comparative historical analysis (archival research), interviews, focus groups, participant observation/ethnography, interpretivist methods/hermeneutics, and culture studies/politics and the arts. Among the issues to be addressed are research design, methods of theory testing, how to write up qualitative research in field notes and for publication, the ethics of field work, and the bureaucratic hurdles of working with human subjects. The written work for the course comprises five short papers.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (15426)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Smyth,Regina
Day & Time: M 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: ELECTORAL AUTHORITARIAN REGIME

Course Description:
Recent research on the relationship between electoral competition and regime change yielded a growing set of studies of the role that elections play in mediating state-society relations in authoritarian (or semi-authoritarian) regimes. Labeled electoral authoritarian regimes, these states combine formal electoral competition with formal and informal structures designed to limit that competition. Drawing from literature from a number of disparate cases, approaches and methods, this class will explore the conditions under which elections may either shore up or weaken authoritarian states. One goal of the class is to debate these issues in light of students¿ expertise and interests across cases and regions, including but not limited to Africa, MENA States, Latin America, Post-communist States and China. We address key issues of authoritarian durability: the role of elections in regime governance, economic growth, sources of popular support for authoritarianism, the importance of symbolic politics, the rise of anti-regime protest movements and an electoral model of regime change. Reading will include book length monographs on a wide range of cases. Assignments will be based on weekly readings as well as a final project that allows students to explore the literature in their country or region of interest.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (30326)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Sinno,Abdulkader
Day & Time: T 6:15 PM - 8:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: RESRCH POL OF MUSLIM COUNTRIES

Course Description:
This course introduces you to some of the latest academic literature and debates on the politics of Muslim-majority countries and the research methods used in these studies. We will focus primarily on studies centered on the Middle East, Afghanistan, and North Africa. Topics addressed in the readings include: the dynamics between government and opposition, Islamist parties, resources and economic development, conflict and civil war, the durability of authoritarianism, prospects for democratization and/or Islamization of government, gender issues, civil society, and social and educational development. The studies we will discuss are grounded in a large variety of methodological approaches, including comparative studies, statistics, game theory, ethnography, elite interviews and experiments. Participants in the seminar will write a research paper on a topic related to the course.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (6012)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: R 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Wells Library 031

Course Description:
The Politics of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Identity. At its most basic, this seminar examines the role(s) of race, ethnicity, and gender in American politics. So why is "identity" in the description? Historically, the political impact of social identities has been studied through the lens of different groups in isolation (such as African-Americans or Women), or groups who share a politically formative experience (such as Immigrants). Yet each of these groups, and many more, co-exist in the political arena. A central part of this course will be to bring these literatures together and see if we can find a coherent set of themes, comparable evidence, and perhaps, shared complexity that allows us to better understand what role these identities will play in the future. In so doing, we will respect the distinctive features of the various research traditions and substantive foci that make up the body of work found in the syllabus. We will begin by distinguishing between the ways that race, ethnicity, and gender are conceptualized in the context of American politics. Using these conceptions as a base, we will then turn to modern research on public opinion, voter behavior, institutions, campaigns, and representation, examining when, where, and how these social identities influence politics. At the end of the course, we will take a closer look at intersections between these identities and reconsider the future role of identity in American politics. As we will discuss numerous unresolved questions in the literature, the end product of the course will be a 15-25 page research paper, to be completed by the student. Students will also receive feedback on their research in later weeks of the course, and present preliminary analyses in a format similar to what one would find at an academic conference.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (10053)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: T 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 137

Course Description:
This seminar provides an overview of theoretical and empirical work pertaining to the analysis of phenomena in world politics that employ network theories and methodologies. This seminar will introduce network analyses of conflict, trade, investment, institutionalization, environmental politics, foreign aid, human rights, and other areas. It will emphasize the role of endogenous structural processes -- such as transitivity and preferential attachment, which are left out of regression-based analyses that assume independence of observations -- in conditioning outcomes in world politics. While this is not a class on network analysis and no prior methodological knowledge is assumed, some previous exposure to these concepts, methods, and the statistical software R will be helpful. Students will be expected to do a substantial amount of reading, complete short writing assignments, and craft a research paper using network methods.

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (33791)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Liff,Adam Phail
Day & Time: R 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C107

Course Description:
This intensive graduate seminar will concentrate on the Cold War and post-Cold War international relations of East Asia, with particular focus on China/Taiwan, Japan, the Koreas, and the United States. During the Cold War, East Asia witnessed intense competition and conflict between the superpowers and among the countries in the region. In the post-Cold War era, the region has been an engine of the global economy, yet the 'rise of China' has also precipitated a major shift in the balance of power--the implications for regional and global peace, prosperity, and stability of which remain unclear. This course will examine the sources of conflict and cooperation in both periods, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia¿s international relations. Readings will be drawn from history, international relations theory, and political science. The course will finish with a debate about the implications of events and trends in the 21st century, with a particular focus on the causes and consequences of China's rise and U.S. Asia-Pacific strategy. Though the course has no concrete prerequisites, students will be expected to become familiar with and to apply major theoretical concepts in international security studies and political economy. It will have particular appeal to motivated graduate students pursuing academic or professional careers in international affairs, political science, foreign policy, and history.

POLS-Y 673:EMPIRICAL THEORY & METHODOLOGY (6013)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Cole,Daniel H.
Day & Time: T 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Political Theory 102
Topic Title: INST ANALYSIS & DVPT: MICRO

Course Description:
This seminar introduces graduate students, visiting scholars, and other participants to the basic principles and selected applications of the "Bloomington School" of political economy (or public choice or institutional analysis), as developed by Vincent and Elinor (Lin) Ostrom and their many colleagues associated with the Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis. Perhaps the most distinctive feature of the "Bloomington School," compared to other schools of public choice at least, is its relative optimism about the ability of ordinary citizens to engage successfully in collective action to solve their own social and combined social-ecological dilemmas at various scales. Specific topics include: * The work for which Lin received the 2009 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences on "economic governance, especially the commons" * The IAD and SES analytical "frameworks," derived from Lin's studies of common-pool resource dilemmas, which attempt to provide common analytical approaches for multidisciplinary research of collective-action problems * Vincent's unique contributions to theories of democracy and public administration, including his conceptions of federalism and "polycentricity," along with early empirical studies of "polycentric governance" in police services and metropolitan governance carried out by Lin and other Workshoppers * Current research programs and projects within the Workshop on collective action, resource management, climate change, health care, and democratic governance * Problems and challenges within the Bloomington School tradition, including fuller representations of ecological dynamics, learning and evaluative processes, how and to what extent formal (including legal) institutions structure the 'rules of the game,' the pervasive influences of culture and power, and how to "embrace complexity" without making our analytical tools to complicated to be useful (especially in the field) * Locating the "Bloomington School" within the context of related schools of thought, including the Virginia and Rochester schools of public choice and the "old" and "new" institutionalisms

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (7360)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Craiutu,Aurelian
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Wells Library 1051

Course Description:
This course explores the concept of revolution in modern political thought in connection with the making of the modern world. It does so by examining key revolutionary moments in the history of modern Europe and America: 1688, 1776, 1789, 1848, 1917, and 1989. These revolutions reshaped the political map and challenged the conceptual vocabulary of social scientists by challenging them to rethink the prerequisites of political change and the conditions under which the latter can be brought to a successful end. The course that has both a historical and a contemporary part focuses on the lessons that scholars could earn from reflecting on the legacies of these historical moments. Here are the questions that we shall emphasize in our discussions: How do revolutions come to an end? What factors can contribute to constitutionalizing the newly gained liberties? How must new regimes deal with the legacy of the past?

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (6014)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (6015)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (6016)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (6017)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Campbell,Amanda Claire

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (6018)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (10810)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (6019)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (6020)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (6021)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (8973)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Scheuerman,William

Course Description:
Description Not Available