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Indiana University Bloomington

Woodburn Hall facilities

Graduate Courses

Graduate Statistics Courses at IUB
Semester:

Fall 2018

POLS-G 901:ADVANCED RESEARCH (3863)

Credit Hours: 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (10967)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Carmines,Edward G.
Day & Time: F 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
The American Politics Workshop (APW) is a regular convening of graduate students and faculty with an interest in American politics. Meeting weekly throughout the academic year, the APW is designed to provide a forum for those conducting research on American politics to present work in progress and, in turn, learn about new and ongoing research projects in the field. APW sessions generally consist of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by 30-40 minutes of discussion. Presenters distribute their working paper or chapter in advance so that APW participants may provide informed, constructive feedback during the session. The APW also hosts lectures given by outside speakers through the Center on American Politics. APW sessions are open to any IU Bloomington-affiliated graduate student or faculty member, but Political Science Ph.D. students may also receive course credit for formal participation in the APW. Students in any year of the program with an interest in American politics are strongly encouraged to enroll in this 1-unit course.

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (31478)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Note: This course required for ALL POLITICAL SCIENCE FIRST YEAR STUDENTS Teaching Political Science I: Understanding and Negotiating the Teaching Environment (semester I only), 1 credit. NOTE: Y550 is for Political Science and Joint Ph.D. Program Students Only. This seminar, which is the first step in the department's Preparing Future Faculty Program, will meet five times during fall semester, on Fridays from 2:45-4 p.m. No readings are required. Students enrolling in the course (which will continue during the spring semester) will receive departmental certification in the Preparing Future Faculty Program. Topics for the five sessions during fall semester are: the nature and rules of the IU teaching environment; effective methods of leading discussions; a micro-teaching session in leading discussions; various methods of assessing students' learning and grading; and resources available for getting help with teaching. First-year students are expected to attend, but the seminar will also be open to continuing graduate students. (Note: Graduate students who are teaching independent sections during fall semester will enroll in a separate section of Y550 designed to support their immediate teaching needs. Y550 may be repeated for credit.)

POLS-Y 550:POLS & PROFESSIONAL DEV (36772)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: F 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 552:ADVANCE SEM FOR AIS TEACHING (35968)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 557:COMPAR POL: APPROACHES & ISS (31479)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Bielasiak,Jacob
Day & Time: R 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 118

Course Description:
The course serves as the introductory survey in the field of comparative politics: the study of methods and concepts that are applicable to more than one country in order to test theories about politics. The seminar's purpose is to provide an overview of how such comparison is achieved, through an examination of the principal methods, approaches, and issues affecting comparative inquiry. The goal is broad familiarity across the field, rather than in-depth exposure to particular methods or modes of analysis. The first part of the course deals with topics related to the comparative method. The larger part of the course will be devoted to the study of various approaches and issues in comparative politics. Due to the broad coverage of the course, readings are from a wide variety of sources. Requirements include class participation, and four short papers on method, approaches, issues, and evaluation of comparative politics.

POLS-Y 575:POLITICAL DATA ANALYSIS I (14643)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Global & International Studies 1128

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 577:TOPICS IN DATA ANALYSIS (33433)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (31481)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Sinno,Abdulkader
Day & Time: W 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
This course introduces you to some of the latest academic literature and debates on the politics of Muslim-majority countries and the research methods used in these studies. We will focus primarily on studies centered on the Middle East, Afghanistan, and North Africa. Topics addressed in the readings include: the dynamics between government and opposition, Islamist parties, resources and economic development, conflict and civil war, the durability of authoritarianism, prospects for democratization and/or Islamization of government, gender issues, civil society, and social and educational development. The studies we will discuss are grounded in a large variety of methodological approaches, including comparative studies, statistics, game theory, ethnography, elite interviews and experiments. Participants in the seminar will write a research paper on a topic related to the course.

POLS-Y 657:COMPARATIVE POLITICS (9969)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Smyth,Regina
Day & Time: M 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 221

Course Description:
Scholars characterize the 1989 Communist revolutions as "social revolutions" that upended the economic, social and political organizations that ordered individual behavior for decades. The collapse of the Soviet Union produced widespread optimism that Communist authoritarian regimes would give way to stable democracies across the successor states. In reality, post-Communist political development has been uneven and ambiguous providing a natural laboratory to explore theories of regime change and regime stability. This course will examine the outcomes of the post-Communist transitions through the lens of a number of critical debates: failure of democratic consolidation, the nature of contemporary autocracy, populism, voting behavior and party formation, protest movements, symbolic politics, federalism, economic reform, and the importance of political legacies. These inquiries-both theoretic and empirical-have led to significant insight about regime transition. While the empirical focus of the course is the post-Communist world, the theoretic debates will be drawn from the broader comparative literature and students focusing on other regions will be encouraged to bring work specific to their country or region into the discussion and even into the reading. We will also use this literature to explore critical topics and debates in the comparative method: the role of area studies, the relative strengths of qualitative and quantitative research, the utility of competing approaches to the study of comparative politics-rational choice, structural, behavioral and cultural. The reading will include important new books in the field as well as articles from both policy and disciplinary journals. Students will be evaluated based on class participation, a book review, short papers, and a final project that can be tailored to the students' individual goals and year in the program.

POLS-Y 661:AMERICAN POLITICS (3876)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: T 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 669:INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (6926)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Ganguly,Sumit
Day & Time: T 10:10 AM - 12:10 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 018

Course Description:
International Security: This course is designed to introduce students to a wide swath of literature on international security. To that end it will examine key concepts and theories including but not limited to deterrence, compellence, coercive diplomacy, military effectiveness and the causes of war. It will also examine key theories including the balance of power, the democratic peace and the nuclear revolution. No prior knowledge of international security is assumed but an interest in international politics and a passing familiarity with international relations theory is desirable.

POLS-Y 673:EMPIRICAL THEORY & METHODOLOGY (36510)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Alston,Lee James
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Bldg Not Assigned TBA

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 675:POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (4884)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Isaac,Jeffrey C.
Day & Time: R 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
A specter is haunting Europe and the United States: the ascendancy of right-wing populist political leaders, movements, and parties that are explicitly hostile to liberalism and sometimes claim to institute a new and more authentic form of "illiberal democracy." The project of instituting a new form of "illiberal democracy" in place of the supposedly outmoded form of liberal democracy is most closely linked to Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has repeatedly announced this intention and gone far to make it real. But the idea is commonly associated with a broader range of political leaders -- Jaroslaw Kaczynski in Poland, Vladimir Putin in Russia, and Recep Tayyep Erdogan in Turkey, among others--who have sought to institute illiberal measures and to justify them, at least in part, by appeal to a more authentic form of "democracy." The victory of Donald Trump in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election is perhaps the most vivid example of this tendency. As Yascha Mounk notes: "Across the affluent, established democracies of North America and Western Europe, the last years have witnessed a meteoric rise of figures who may not be quite so brash or garish as Trump and yet bear a striking resemblance to him: Marine Le Pen in France, Frauke Petry in Germany, Geert Wilders in the Netherlands, and many of the leading Brexiteers in the United Kingdom. They too harness a new level of anger that is quite unlike anything liberal democracies have witnessed in a half-century. They too promise to stand up for ordinary people, to do away with a corrupt political elite, and to put the ethnic and religious minorities who are now (supposedly) being favored in their rightful (subordinate) place. They, too, are willing to do away with liberal political institutions like an independent judiciary or a free, robust press so long as those stand in the way of the people's will. Together, they are building a new type of political regime that is slowly coming into its own: illiberal democracy. Critics often attack Trump, Le Pen, and their cohort for being undemocratic. But that is to misunderstand both their priorities and the reasons for their appeal. For the most part, their belief in the will of the people is real. Their primary objection to the status quo is, quite simply, that institutional roadblocks like independent courts or norms like a 'politically correct' concern for the rights of minorities stop the system from channeling the people's righteous anger into public policy. What they promise, then, is not to move away from popular rule but rather to strip it of its artificial, liberal guise-all the while embodying the only true version of the people's will." These party-political developments have been accompanied by a resurgence of neo-fascist movements and an upsurge of violence directed against immigrants, ethnic, racial, and sexual minorities, and even political adversaries (think Charlottesville or even "lock her up!"). While this wave has been at least temporarily stemmed in certain places (France, Austria), it has crested elsewhere, in Central Europe (Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic), Eurasia (Turkey and Russia), and the U.S. with the election of Trump. The recent success of the neo-fascist Alternative for Democracy party in the German Bundestag elections is a further sign that this plague grows among us. It is widely understood that these developments signal a broad and deep crisis of the liberal democratic state. This course will explore responses to this crisis. While it will center on the reading and critical discussion of very recent books and essays published by political theorists and public intellectuals (most published in the past year), it will also attend to important political responses to the crisis. We will read essays by Jurgen Habermas, Yannis Varoufakis, Etienne Balibar, Chantal Mouffe, and Pierre Rosanvallon. In addition, course discussion will center on the following texts: Jeffrey C. Isaac, "Is There Ill

POLS-Y 681:READINGS IN COMP POLITICS (3877)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 683:READINGS IN AMER POLITICS (3878)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 685:READ IN PUBLIC ADMIN,LAW & POL (3879)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 687:READINGS IN INTL RELATIONS (3880)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 689:READ IN POLITIC THEORY & MTHD (3881)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 780:DIR RES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (3882)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 880:THESIS A M (3883)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 4.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (3884)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 890:THESIS PH D (6159)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Course Description:
Description Not Available