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Indiana University Bloomington

Woodburn Hall facilities

The World Politics Research Seminar

The World Politics Research Seminar is a regular faculty symposium on research-in-progress in Comparative Politics, International Relations, Political Economy, and related fields. It is organized within the Department of Political Science but we are eager for faculty of other units on the Bloomington campus to attend, participate, and present their work. Seminar papers are invited for inclusion in the WPRS Working Paper Series. Faculty members who are interested in joining the WPRS listserv or presenting their work should contact Will Winecoff.

 

Friday, February 9th, 10:30 a.m. in Woodburn 218

Title: TK

AUTHOR: Avital Livny (University of Illinois)

DISCUSSANT: TBD

ABSTRACT: TK

 

Friday, March 9th, 10:30 a.m. in Woodburn 218

Title: “How Once a Dangerous Idea of Floating Exchange Rates Replaced the Bretton Woods System: Ideas, Interests, and International Institutional Change” 

AUTHOR: Youn Ki (Miami University)

DISCUSSANT: TBD

ABSTRACT: Until the mid-1960s, American political and business elites regarded “fixed exchange rates as graven in stone and beyond the tampering of mere mortals.”  American elites considered floating the dollar as tantamount to a return to U.S. isolationism and the international disorder which characterized the 1930s. However, the United States embraced the idea of currency flexibility by the early 1970s, catalyzing the emergence and development of a new floating exchange regime. This study examines the transition from the Bretton Woods system to a floating regime by focusing on the role of ideas, interests, and temporality. Our extensive archival research demonstrates that a group of neoclassical economists developed an ideational foundation on which American government officials and business leaders could build a policy coalition favoring a switch to a floating system in the 1960s. We further trace how such coalition actually materialized over the late 1960s and early 1970s as the political and business elites bought into the economists’ ideas for different reasons. This paper challenges the conventional wisdom of an unstoppable and abrupt transition of the modern international monetary order in the early 1970s. Instead, it emphasizes a relatively gradual acceptance of new ideas among the American elites over the 1960s and early 1970s. It also highlights how the timing and sequence of events affected political processes. 

 

Friday, April 13th, 10:30 a.m. in Woodburn 218

Title: TK

AUTHOR: Sarah Bauerle Danzman

DISCUSSANT: TBD

ABSTRACT: TK

 

Friday, May tbd, 10:30 a.m. in Woodburn 218

Title: “Reconsidering the political role of humanitarian NGOs in global governance”

AUTHOR: Charlotte Dany (Goethe-University Frankfurt)

DISCUSSANT: TBD

ABSTRACT: TK

 

 

 

WPRS Archived Presentations