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Undergraduate Courses

Course Spotlight Fall 2016 Reader's Corner Fall 2015
Semester:

Spring 2017

POLS-X 471:TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP (7586)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 476:POLS PRACTICUM III (12395)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hayes,Matthew

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 476:POLS PRACTICUM III (14198)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 477:FIELD EXPERIENCE IN POL SCI (29845)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 477:FIELD EXPERIENCE IN POL SCI (29846)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 490:UNDERGRAD READINGS IN POL SCI (29843)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.
Day & Time: W 4:45 PM - 6:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: HONORS COLLOQUIUM

Course Description:
Political science majors working on their senior honors theses take this seminar (2 hours during fall semester, 1 hour in the spring) to expand their understanding of research design, data collection, and analysis, and to share their thesis progress and questions with others writing honors theses.

POLS-X 490:UNDERGRAD READINGS IN POL SCI (29844)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Political science majors working on their senior honors theses take this seminar (2 hours during fall semester, 1 hour in the spring) to expand their understanding of research design, data collection, and analysis, and to share their thesis progress and questions with others writing honors theses.

POLS-Y 100:AMERICAN POLIT CONTROVERSIES (11651)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Dalecki,Jacek
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Jordan Hall 124

Course Description:
Politics is the study and practice of the decision-making process involved in managing a state or a government. It deals with "who gets what, when and how" or "who could do what to whom," to use celebrated phrases. Because political relations involve power and authority, politics and controversy go hand in hand, either overtly or covertly. This course will explore several controversies that have permeated American politics, ranging from contentions about the rationale behind the American political system (motivations of the Founding Fathers, the Electoral College, gerrymandering) through disagreements over the essence of public policies (death penalty, the drinking age, subsidizing the Arts) to debates about civil rights and liberties (abortion, freedom of expression, surveillance). We will focus on what types of arguments have been used to endorse/reject specific views and how arguments in favor of/against these views have been produced. The goal of the course is thus two-fold: to examine key debates present in American politics and to appreciate the art of making effective political arguments.

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (11925)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Singleton,Shannon Mae

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (12568)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Vetter,Michael Joseph

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10177)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Psychology 115

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10178)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: R 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 217

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10179)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 217

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10180)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM - 9:55 AM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10181)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (14287)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Woodcock,Michael David

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (14288)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Buntin,Matthew T

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (14289)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Gastineau,Gregory Franic

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (7574)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: TR 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 100

Course Description:
Introduction to the nature of government and the dynamics of American politics. Origin and nature of the American federal system and its political party base.

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (7575)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Barbour,D. Christine
Day & Time: TR 9:00 AM - 11:35 AM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 005

Course Description:
Introduction to the nature of government and the dynamics of American politics. Origin and nature of the American federal system and its political party base. *class meets 2nd 8 weeks only*

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (9145)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: T 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 217

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (9146)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: T 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 217

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (9147)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 008

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (9148)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 005

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (9149)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Psychology 115

Course Description:
DISCUSSION SECTION

POLS-Y 105:INTRO TO POLITICAL THEORY (7576)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Craiutu,Aurelian
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 120

Course Description:
The course offers an introduction to key themes in political theory by focusing on representative selections from major works in political philosophy such as Plato's Apology, Cicero's On Duties, Machiavelli's The Prince, Hobbes's Leviathan, Locke's Second Treatise on Government, Rousseau's Social Contract, the Federalist Papers, and Mill's On Liberty. A few other recommended readings and movies will complement the required readings. The course will offer a broad framework for discussing topics that are central to politics and public life: sovereignty, power, constitutionalism, the role of laws, civic virtue, religion, democracy, justice, freedom, and equality. Special attention will be paid to exploring the context in which our authors wrote their works, the main concepts they used, and the implications of their ideas for contemporary debates. The requirements for the class will be properly tailored to an introductory course.

POLS-Y 107:INTRO TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS (7577)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: MacLean,Lauren Mathews Morris
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 204
Topic Title: REAL POLITICS AROUND THE WORLD

Course Description:
Real Politics Around the World This course looks at a variety of regions around the world (i.e., Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and North America) in order to investigate some of the most important and fundamental questions about politics: Why are some countries democracies and others dictatorships? Why are some countries wealthy and others desperately poor? Why do diverse ethnic groups massacre each other in some countries and not in others? By learning about political life in different countries and comparing their different experiences, students will develop the skills to think critically and begin to answer these important questions. The course will focus on several countries from the above regions, including: China, Nigeria, Ghana, India, Northern Ireland, Russia, Rwanda, the U.K., and the U.S. Students are required to: attend class and participate in class discussions; do all assigned reading; and, take four quizzes, one mid-term and one final exam. There is only one book that you are required to purchase for this class: 1) Patrick O'Neil, Essentials of Comparative Politics. 5th edition. Professsor MacLean loves teaching and has received four IU Trustee Teaching Awards since joining IU in 2005.

POLS-Y 109:INTRO TO INTL RELATIONS (7578)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
MEETS WITH HONORS SECTION As we enter a new millennium, nearly every area of the world is beset by violent conflict arising from these and many other sources. This introductory-level course will provide you with basic conceptual tools and information to help you understand some of the major problems in world politics in recent decades and think critically about possible solutions to those problems. The primary focus will be on the causes of conflict and war; the advantages and disadvantages of and alternatives to force for achieving foreign policy goals; and ways of preventing or reducing the likelihood, severity and duration of war. The course will include a simulation of the United Nations General Assembly in which all students will participate as delegates. Prerequisites: none, but background or interest in world politics or history will help.

POLS-Y 109:INTRO TO INTL RELATIONS (14025)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
HONORS SECTION As we enter a new millennium, nearly every area of the world is beset by violent conflict arising from these and many other sources. This introductory-level course will provide you with basic conceptual tools and information to help you understand some of the major problems in world politics in recent decades and think critically about possible solutions to those problems. The primary focus will be on the causes of conflict and war; the advantages and disadvantages of and alternatives to force for achieving foreign policy goals; and ways of preventing or reducing the likelihood, severity and duration of war. The course will include a simulation of the United Nations General Assembly in which all students will participate as delegates. Prerequisites: none, but background or interest in world politics or history will help.

POLS-Y 200:CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL TOPICS (33601)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Model,Timothy Anatole
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Politics of Corruption This class explores the dark "underbelly" of politics: corruption. The course will introduce students to the ways in which people around the world evade rules through corruption. The course will begin with the different elements of corruption, such as bribery and nepotism. We will then study corruption and governance by exposing the workings of political machines and mafias. We will finish the course with an overview of anti-corruption strategies. Lectures and films will compare corrupt activities across Russia, China, Italy, and the United States. Students will leave the class with knowledge of corruption and its implications, as well as an appreciation of the importance of studying this political "underbelly."

POLS-Y 200:CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL TOPICS (37922)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Lindley Hall 019

Course Description:
"World Politics in a Time of Populist Nationalism" Populist political movements have been ascendant in many countries since the global financial crisis that began in 2007. The election of Donald Trump in the United States and the successful Brexit referendum in the United Kingdom are two major developments, but right-wing parties (and some left-wing parties too) are gaining support in other countries, particularly in Europe. Others are facing "democratic backsliding," or an erosion of democratic institutions. This course will examine these contemporary developments in real time. We will seek to understand them by engaging with political science theories of populism and party politics as well as contemporary new sources and films. The goal is to understand what is causing the rise of more extreme forms of politics right now, by examining issues related to economic stagnation, income inequality, immigration, terrorism, and other factors. This is a seminar class, so priority will be given to discussion rather than lecture.

POLS-Y 200:CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL TOPICS (37935)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Liff,Adam Phail
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Geological Sciences 436

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 202:POLTCS & CITIZEN IN INFORM AGE (8921)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 205:ANALYZING POLITICS (8289)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Sinno,Abdulkader
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 204

Course Description:
This course introduces you to how political scientists, and academics in general, create knowledge. It is a hands-on course that teaches you the basics so you can produce more rigorous research and provide intelligent answers to puzzles that interest you. In the process, you will learn a little about your own mind, become a more intelligent consumer of scholarship and news, and develop ways of thinking that help you make better decisions in life. We rely on both qualitative and quantitative (statistics) methods.

POLS-Y 205:ANALYZING POLITICS (15311)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Sinno,Abdulkader
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
This course introduces you to how political scientists, and academics in general, create knowledge. It is a hands-on course that teaches you the basics so you can produce more rigorous research and provide intelligent answers to puzzles that interest you. In the process, you will learn a little about your own mind, become a more intelligent consumer of scholarship and news, and develop ways of thinking that help you make better decisions in life. We rely on both qualitative and quantitative (statistics) methods.

POLS-Y 211:INTRODUCTION TO LAW (11587)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Dalecki,Jacek
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 120

Course Description:
Law is defined as rules of conduct that govern a society. In a democratic society, law serves as a guarantee of governmental accountability and social rights. Specifically, law is intended to assure that no person or branch of government may rise above rules made by elected public officials, that the rights of citizens are protected from arbitrary use of power, and that rules of societal conduct are clear, fairly enforced, and guarantee predictability as to how a society functions. The expression "the rule of law" (or "everyone is subject to the law") is often used to encapsulate the essence of this set of principles. In brief, the rule of law is said to be a foundation for both order and liberties. We will examine this credo through three lenses. (1) Origins of law and formulations of the rule of law. How did law come about? How was the concept of the rule of law established and formalized? What are the main theories of law and the rule of law in circulation today? (2) The United States court system and its highest judicial authority, the Supreme Court. How is the court system organized? What is the relation between the courts on and between state and federal levels? What is the role of the Supreme Court in American politics? What factors affect decisions made by the Supreme Court Justices? (3) The international context of law. What is the relation between domestic and international law? Can principles of the rule of law govern relations among nation states? Is it possible to have a global system of law? The implicit goal of this course is also to reflect on a more pointed question: Is law neutral and objective or is law like a spider web through which the big flies pass and the little ones get caught?

POLS-Y 212:MAKING DEMOCRACY WORK (14670)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Carugati,Maria Federica
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 204

Course Description:
Today, almost every country proclaims itself to be a democracy, a republic -- or both. However, democracy is also perceived to be under threat: democratic leaders increasingly reflect on whether democracies can compete with authoritarian governments, and on the potential costs of upholding and spreading democratic ideals in the face of threats such as growing inequality, extremist opposition, and poor economic performance. Could studying the successes and failures of democratic and republican government in ancient Greece and Rome help us fix what is broken in our own political systems? In this course, students will tackle the phenomenon of non-authoritarian regimes in a world-historical perspective and through a problem-solving approach. The first half of the class is an overview of experiments in democratic and republican governments - from their origins in Greece and Rome to modern liberal democracies. In the second half of the class, we tackle a series of problems facing modern democracies, such as inequality, corruption, violence, and exclusion. The goal of the class is to provide students with the instruments to approach contemporary governmental failures through the lenses of history, comparative politics, and political philosophy. The requirements for the course include: active participation, five quizzes, two exams, and a short research paper. Active participation means being able to summarize and discuss assigned readings and additional class material. The required readings are diverse and include newspaper articles, academic books and journals, and ancient historical and philosophical writings. Additional class material includes blog posts and movies. There are no books for purchase. The course has no prerequisites and students need no previous knowledge of either political science or ancient history. This course takes seriously the notion of "learning from the past," and it encourages students to think creatively about politics -- as the ancients did.

POLS-Y 300:TOPICS IN CUR POL & GOVERNANCE (34101)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW S&H

Instructor: Liff,Adam Phail
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Wylie Hall 115
Topic Title: UNITED STATES-EAST ASIAN RELTN

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 300:TOPICS IN CUR POL & GOVERNANCE (30914)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
The Politics of Economic Crisis and Reform Economic crises have been a recurrent feature of global capitalism since its beginning. These crises have significant effects on economic and political systems. Recent research suggests that crises are increasing in both frequency and severity, as evidenced by contemporary instability in North America, Europe, and the Arab World. Crises are frequently followed by calls for reform. Some reform efforts target specific market activities while others involve modifications to political institutions. Some efforts are instigated by international institutions while others are initiated by domestic polities. This course will consider the politics of crisis and reform from a comparative and international political economy perspective. In addition to learning general theories of crisis and reform, we will study in-depth case studies of important crisis episodes in the era of industrial capitalism, and seek to understand both the causes and consequences of crisis events. We will examine the impact of various crisis responses, conducted under different political and economic systems.

POLS-Y 300:TOPICS IN CUR POL & GOVERNANCE (30916)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: O'Brien,Diana
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 301:POL PARTIES & INTEREST GROUPS (7579)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 003

Course Description:
Political parties and interest groups, to many people, are like warts on the body politic. The writers of the Constitution felt pretty much the same way. The long-standing criticism is that these groups create conflicts where there are none, and cause the gridlock that so often paralyzes government. Then why is it that the writers of the Constitution in fact created political parties within a decade of founding the republic, most Americans still consider themselves to be either Democrats or Republicans, and the national party organizations are better-funded and more active in campaigns than they have been for most of our history? And when nations such as Russia, Poland, and Romania have thrown off their previous rulers and taken steps toward becoming democracies, why have these nations so quickly produced political parties of their own? Our job in this course is to understand what parties and interest groups are capable of doing as intermediaries between citizens and the government, and what they actually do in practice. We'll look at third parties, political action committees, social movements, campaign finance, and the relationships between parties and interest groups as well. There will be a substantial amount of reading in this course. Two essay exams and several short research projects will be assigned.

POLS-Y 305:CONSTITUTNL RIGHTS & LIBERTIES (7580)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Failer,Judith L.
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 310

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 307:INDIANA STATE GOV & POLITICS (7581)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 311:DEMOCRACY & NATIONAL SECURITY (13217)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Kastart,Wynand
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM - 7:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 316:PUB OPINION & POL PARTICIPATN (14676)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room Number: Auditorium A152

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 318:THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (16271)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 319:THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS (12116)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Kuchem,Matthew Douglas
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 320:JUDICIAL POLITICS (12117)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Braman,Eileen
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 140

Course Description:
In this class we will be examine at the American judicial system. We will study the foundations of law and the many assumptions behind conceptions of judicial authority. We will delve into federal and state court organization, the selection of judges and the role of other players in the legal system. We will cover civil and criminal trial procedure as well as the various factors that influence judges' decision-making. Students should come away with a better understanding of how our court system operates and the philosophy underlying specific legal practices.

POLS-Y 321:THE MEDIA AND POLITICS (16263)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Hayes,Matthew
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 003

Course Description:
Examines the contemporary relationship between the media and politics, including use of the media by politicians and public officials, media coverage of governmental activities, and media coverage of campaigns and elections. Course focuses primarily on the United States, but includes comparative perspectives.

POLS-Y 329:RACIAL & ETHNIC POLITICS USA (30826)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H DUS

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Wylie Hall 005

Course Description:
Issues of race and ethnicity have shaped American political history from the colonial era to the present, and certainly well before the election of President Barack Obama and candidacy of Donald Trump. Indeed, over the past half century, no national election would have been competitive without including the political preferences of racial and ethnic minority groups (including African-Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Native Americans) along with non-Hispanic Whites. Thus, a complete understanding of contemporary American politics demands knowledge of racial and ethnic politics. In this course, we will explore the development and maintenance of racial and ethnic identities, the inclusion of minority groups and interests into electoral politics, racism and forms of conflict between ethnic groups, and how immigration and demographic shift will impact the future political landscape. While we will study the historical contours of race in America, the focus of the course will be on interpreting how race and ethnicity shape politics today and will continue to impact the American political system going forward. Special attention will be placed on recent and future elections (especially 2008, 2012, and 2016), and the shift from a Black-White racial binary to a multi-ethnic framework.

POLS-Y 339:MIDDLE EASTERN POLITICS (8922)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 340:EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS (9837)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 343:POLITICS OF INTL DEVELOPMENT (8923)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 343:POLITICS OF INTL DEVELOPMENT (11588)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Schon,Justin
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Fine Arts 010

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 344:CIVIL WARS (30829)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Loyle,Cyanne
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 347

Course Description:
This course will examine modern civil wars, focusing on the causes, conduct, and consequences of these conflicts. The goal of this class is to better understand how civil wars begin so we can ultimately work to end or prevent this type of violence. Emphasis will be placed on applying research and theory within the field of political science to contemporary cases of civil war such as Northern Ireland, Uganda, Afghanistan, Iraq, Ukraine and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

POLS-Y 350:POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (10182)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
The Europe Union (EU) is the world's most advanced experiment in pooling national sovereignty. Beginning with the European Economic Community in the 1950s, attempts to unify the once-warring nations of Europe have advanced dramatically over the past sixty years. But the EU is also under siege. The 28 member organization faces pressure like never before as its very purpose is being questioned in light of a prolonged economic downturn, the refugee crisis, and indecisive leadership. The June 2016 Brexit referendum and Britain's decision to leave the EU has only heightened these concerns. Could the EU come unraveled? And what does this mean for US-European relations? In Y350 we will discuss these developments through a general introduction to the politics, governing structure, and policies of the European Union. We will examine of the evolution of European integration. We then will look at how the EU is governed, and where the power lies. Next, we investigate how the EU and "Europe" are viewed in the eyes of national governments and by individual citizens. The last part of the course surveys important European-level policies and issues, as well as discusses relations between the EU and the rest of the world, including the United States.

POLS-Y 350:POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (8924)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 350:POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (8925)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 350:POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (10022)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 352:THE HOLOCAUST & POLITICS (30917)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Bielasiak,Jacob
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Lee Norvelle Theatre Drama/ Ne A201

Course Description:
The course examines the politics of Nazi Germany's systematic attempt to exterminate Jews and other undesirable populations during the Second World War. A major part of the course centers on the ideological arguments and political actions concerning the "Jewish Question" and the evolution of decisions towards the Final Solution. We concentrate on the issue of responsibility through an examination of the perpetrators¿ and bystanders¿ responses to the annihilation. Another major aspect of the course looks at the fate and responses of the victim communities. The final section deals with the legacy of the Holocaust on post-war political history and the ethical impact on humanity. The content of the course presents each of us with an emotional, often painful experience that must be harnessed for reasoned understanding. To that end, we will use a variety of sources, historical studies and survivors' testimonies, documentary and fictional accounts, films and poems. Class requirements include three examinations, and in-class assignments so that we can personalize the issues through reaction essays and first-person responses. The point is not only to study the Holocaust but also to account for the tragedy in a way that confronts our humanity and our commitment to become more than bystanders to history.

POLS-Y 353:POLITICS OF GENDER & SEXUALITY (30918)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: O'Brien,Diana
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (10023)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (10024)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
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POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (10025)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
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POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (10026)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (8926)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (8927)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (8928)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (8929)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (8930)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (8931)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (30906)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Ganguly,Sumit
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Global & International Studies 0007

Course Description:
International Politics of South Asia The population of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Bhutan Nepal and Afghanistan) constitutes a fifth of humanity. The international politics of this region enables us to study a host of issues in international politics. To that end this course will examine the causes of intra and interstate war, the sources of nuclear proliferation, the spillover of ethnic conflicts and the possibilities and limitations of regional cooperation. No prior background knowledge of the region is assumed though an interest in international politics is desirable.

POLS-Y 363:COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY (10027)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 366:CURR FOREIGN POLICY PROBLEMS (8932)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 367:INTERNATIONAL LAW (10028)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 368:RUSSIAN & SOVIET FOREIGN POL (14699)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 111

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 375:WAR & INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT (12695)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Rasler,Karen A.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Optometry School 111

Course Description:
This course surveys the leading theories of the causes of terrorism, internal conflict, and interstate wars (wars between states). The class will start with terrorism and suicide terrorism more specifically. We will study the major theories and explanations about why terrorism occurs within and across states. Afterwards, we will move to theories about larger scale forms of internal conflict (e.g., revolts, ethnic conflicts and civil wars) that will include a discussion of the recent uprisings in the Middle East. Finally, we will examine theories of interstate wars that include power transition models, diversionary conflict, and misperceptions. The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the causes of war between and within states as well as the analytical skills to make their own assessments about historical and contemporary events in the future.

POLS-Y 376:INTL POLITICAL ECONOMY (8933)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 379:ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY (13236)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Failer,Judith L.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Wells Library 033

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 381:CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT (8934)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 381:CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT (10029)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 382:MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT (10030)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H GCC

Instructor: Craiutu,Aurelian
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 003

Course Description:
This course will be organized around three main themes: advising the "prince," limiting power (constitutionalism) and democracy between theory and practice. They will provide the lenses through which we shall read key texts in modern political thought. In our discussions and lectures, we will address the following questions centered on the following three main clusters: I. What do we mean when we say that someone is a good or bad politician? What are the requirements of effective leadership in politics and public life? Is compromise desirable in politics? How can we distinguish between opportunism and integrity in politics? II. What is necessary in order to write good constitutions and make them work? III. What is democracy and what are its real virtues and limitations? Is this the best form of government? The required readings include Machiavelli's The Prince, Hobbes' Leviathan, Locke's Second Treatise on Government, and Rousseau's On the Social Contract as well as representative selections from Tocqueville's Democracy in America and Marx's writings. The requirement for the class include a midterm, a take-home final paper, and several short quizzes.

POLS-Y 384:DEV AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (7582)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H DUS

Instructor: Goldsmith,Zachary Robert
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 399:POLITICS OF THE UN (14707)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 401:STUDIES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (8935)

Credit Hours: 2.0 - 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 405:MODELS&THEORIES POL DEC MAKING (30921)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Razo,Armando
Day & Time: T 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Politics is driven by the decisions of individuals and groups in society. The types of decisions that are made in any society range from individual choices such as deciding whom to support in a given election, to the collective choice of public policies made by a group of public officials. This course introduces students to basic tools and models of rational choice and game theory to understand political decision making. We start with a basic theory of how individuals make their own decisions. We will also explore the consequences of strategic behavior that arises when individuals interact or compete with other political actors. To that effect, we build upon the basic theory of individual choice to examine the complexities that arise when groups of people come together to make a decision. To understand group decision making, we will study how institutions, or the political context in which group decisions are made, affect group choices. This course provides students with an accessible, yet rigorous, introduction to modern theories of political decision making to accomplish three general goals. First, students will learn concept and tools that will allow them to re-examine and integrate material from previous courses within a common analytical framework. Second, by learning to analyze political problems in a logical and abstract way, students will be better prepared for more advanced courses in political science and other social sciences. Finally, the tools developed in this course have many practical applications for everyday decision making including various domains outside of political science such as business and economics.

POLS-Y 407:PROBLEMS IN COMPARTVE POLITICS (10031)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (9150)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Loyle,Cyanne
Day & Time: M 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C107
Topic Title: SENIOR SEMINAR

Course Description:
Human Rights and Justice following Civil War Over the last thirty years we have seen a rapid increase in the push for accountability following political transitions and violent conflict as a means of reckoning with gross violations of individual human rights. Including the trials at Nuremberg and Tokyo, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the creation of the International Criminal Court, these processes, called transitional justice, have become a prominent way for dealing with violence and its legacy in the 21st Century. This seminar is designed as a survey of the existing transitional justice options following armed conflict. In addition to cataloguing the range of different mechanisms that can and have been used to address human rights violations, we will discuss the main debates and obstacles surrounding their use.

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (9151)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Smyth,Regina
Day & Time: R 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: SENIOR SEMINAR

Course Description:
People Power in the 21st Century Since the global economic crisis in 2008, citizens in countries from the U.S. to Spain, Iceland, Russia and Hong Kong have mounted large protest movements against their governments. Despite the similar timeframe in which these social movements emerged, they differ along important characteristics: their causes, organizational structure, leadership, and repertoires. They also have emerged in different political contexts, including in both democratic and authoritarian regimes. This class will consider the causes and consequences of citizen actions on the politics of these countries. The first few weeks of the class will provide a framework to understand citizen protest. In second half of the class, each student will pick a protest movement that interests them and apply this framework to that case. Students may choose any protest movement that emerged between 2008 and the present from the Icelandic Kitchen Utensils protest to Hong Kong¿s Umbrella Revolution to Black Lives Matter in the U.S. The writing requirements will be fulfilled by students producing a series of short papers on their case written for different audiences: an annotated bibliography of sources for their work, a seven page background paper, a five page analytic paper, a policy memo, a blog post, and a powerpoint presentation.

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (9152)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Braman,Eileen
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 335
Topic Title: SENIOR SEMINAR

Course Description:
In this class we will investigate how psychological theory helps us to understand how people act (and interact) in the political arena. We will start with basic concepts including attitudes, behavior and cognition. We will discuss what these terms mean and how they interact to shape individual political experience. We will take some time to talk about applications of the experimental method to political phenomena. Focusing on the American political context we will discuss how citizens form opinions about issues and candidates and how they may be subject to persuasion by media outlets and political elites. We will also discuss how elite decision-makers, including judges and world leaders, structure their decision tasks to maximize the influence of "expert" knowledge and prevent certain biases. These efforts are not always successful and we will discuss what this means in terms of the larger political context in which they are acting. Finally, we will explore how people come to identify as part of a larger "social group," how they interact based on those identities and the implications for political phenomena including racial and ethnic conflict. This class fulfills the intensive writing requirement. Students will be required to write weekly assignments, several papers and a final research project.

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (13738)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Rasler,Karen A.
Day & Time: R 11:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 235

Course Description:
Political Contention in the Arab Spring: Causes and Outcomes This course examines the series of popular uprisings that shook the Arab World during the last five years. Known as the Arab Spring, the uprisings have brought about profound structural and ideological transformations that could last decades. Yet, we don't know much about the dynamics and outcomes of the uprisings. What is exactly the nature of these popular uprisings? What are their causes? Who is driving the change and what types of governments might emerge in the near future? How would these transformations affect regional power politics and the Arab states' relations with the rest of the world? Through readings, documentaries, and engaged discussions we will gain an insider view on these events as they unfolded. The first part of the course will focus on the causes of these protest campaigns and how youths, women, artists, cyber activists, and filmmakers confronted and challenged authoritarian regimes. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the outcomes of these protest campaigns and explain the trajectory from peaceful democratic transition (Tunisia) to increasing authoritarianism (Egypt, Bahrain) and civil war (Yemen, Libya and Syria). We will focus on the unfolding dynamics of these protest campaigns in order to discern their similarities and differences in the types of protest mobilization they exhibited and the outcomes of these protest mobilizations.

POLS-Y 496:FOREIGN STUDY IN POLITICAL SCI (7587)

Credit Hours: 3.0 - 8.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 499:HONORS THESIS (7588)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 12.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available