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Undergraduate Courses

Course Spotlight Fall 2016 Reader's Corner Fall 2015
Semester:

Spring 2018

POLS-X 471:TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP (4255)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 476:POLS PRACTICUM III (8500)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Braman,Eileen

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 476:POLS PRACTICUM III (10067)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hellwig,Timothy

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 477:FIELD EXPERIENCE IN POL SCI (12505)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 477:FIELD EXPERIENCE IN POL SCI (12506)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-X 490:UNDERGRAD READINGS IN POL SCI (12504)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 6.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 100:AMERICAN POLIT CONTROVERSIES (7852)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Dalecki,Jacek
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 101

Course Description:
Politics is the study and practice of the decision-making process involved in managing a state or a government. It deals with "who gets what, when and how" or "who could do what to whom," to use celebrated phrases. Because political relations involve power and authority, politics and controversy go hand in hand, either overtly or covertly. This course will explore several controversies that have permeated American politics, ranging from contentions about the rationale behind the American political system (motivations of the Founding Fathers, the Electoral College, redistricting) through disagreements over the essence of public policies (death penalty, the drinking age, subsidizing the Arts) to debates about civil rights and liberties (abortion, freedom of expression, surveillance). We will focus on what types of arguments have been used to endorse/reject specific views and how arguments in favor of/against these views have been produced. The goal of the course is thus two-fold: to examine key debates present in American politics and to appreciate the art of making effective political arguments.

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (8098)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Singleton,Shannon Mae

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (12190)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Paternoster,Elizabeth Ann

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10146)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Woodcock,Michael David

Course Description:
Since we can't escape from politics in our lives, we might as well learn to appreciate and enjoy them. In this class we explore American politics: its rules (the Constitution), its institutions (the Presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy), its participants (individual voters, parties, interests groups, and the media) and its product (social, economic and foreign policy). We not only cover the facts of American politics, we also focus on becoming informed critics and intelligent consumers of the daily barrage of news from the media. Grades will be based on four exams and in class exercises. Optional feature-length movies are shown at night for extra credit. Readings average 50 pages of textbook per week, and current events articles found online. This course is designed for non-majors, beginning majors, and people considering becoming political science majors.

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10147)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Glazebrooks,Leona Renee'

Course Description:
Since we can't escape from politics in our lives, we might as well learn to appreciate and enjoy them. In this class we explore American politics: its rules (the Constitution), its institutions (the Presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy), its participants (individual voters, parties, interests groups, and the media) and its product (social, economic and foreign policy). We not only cover the facts of American politics, we also focus on becoming informed critics and intelligent consumers of the daily barrage of news from the media. Grades will be based on four exams and in class exercises. Optional feature-length movies are shown at night for extra credit. Readings average 50 pages of textbook per week, and current events articles found online. This course is designed for non-majors, beginning majors, and people considering becoming political science majors.

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (10148)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Gastineau,Gregory Franic

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (8643)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Vetter,Michael Joseph

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (33770)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: TR 2:45 PM - 3:35 PM
Building & Room Number: Hodge Hall (Business School) 1059

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to American national politics. The central premise is that nothing in politics happens by accident ¿ everything you see is the result of the choices people make.  The goal is to understand American politics by (a) explaining why people act as they do, and (b) understanding the consequences of these choices. The overriding assumption is that people are rational actors, meaning that they sensible reasons for preferring one choice over another.   The secondary emphasis is on facts, both to provide basic information about American politics and to demonstrate that there is evidence behind the theories and arguments presented in the class.  The class will be ruthlessly contemporary, emphasizing the political issues, campaigns, and controversies that are part of our everyday life.   While the class covers both the science of politics and the politics of the real world, it does not put a partisan spin on events.  The class will focus on explaining how politics works without taking a position on whether one set of opinions or preferences are better than another.   The sole text is American Politics Today (fifth edition).

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (6634)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Sycamore Hall 103

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (6635)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: R 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 010

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (6636)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 010

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (6637)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM - 9:55 AM
Building & Room Number: Radio-TV 226

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (6638)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room Number: Radio-TV 226

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (4246)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: TR 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C006

Course Description:
Since we can't escape from politics in our lives, we might as well learn to appreciate and enjoy them. In this class we explore American politics: its rules (the Constitution), its institutions (the Presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy), its participants (individual voters, parties, interests groups, and the media) and its product (social, economic and foreign policy). We not only cover the facts of American politics, we also focus on becoming informed critics and intelligent consumers of the daily barrage of news from the media. Grades will be based on four exams and in class exercises. Optional feature-length movies are shown at night for extra credit. Readings average 50 pages of textbook per week, and current events articles found online. This course is designed for non-majors, beginning majors, and people considering becoming political science majors.

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (4247)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Barbour,D. Christine
Day & Time: TR 9:00 AM - 11:35 AM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 347

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (5675)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: T 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C114

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (5676)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: T 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C114

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (5677)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Sycamore Hall 103

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (5678)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Auditorium A152

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 103:INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICS (5679)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bianco,William
Day & Time: W 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C112

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 105:INTRO TO POLITICAL THEORY (4248)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Scheuerman,William
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 109

Course Description:
The course begins by addressing the most basic political question: why obey government? If we are to be expected to obey government, what should we legitimately expect in return? After examining how prominent political actors and thinkers have tackled this issue, the course considers the most influential modern answer to it, as formulated by writers associated with what soon became described as "liberalism." After examining liberalism, we turn to critics, on both the left and right, who have argued that modern liberalism fails sufficiently to explain why people should obey their governments. Finally, we conclude by discussing how the political theories examined in the course can help us make sense of Donald Trump and other right-wing "populist" leaders around the world. Course format is old-fashioned: you read, discuss, and write about a diverse collection of political figures and thinkers, including Plato, John Locke, Thomas Jefferson, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Henry Thoreau, and M.L. King. The aim is to provide a basic introduction to some of the most important political ideas and theories, as well as help you become a more informed and alert citizen.

POLS-Y 107:INTRO TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS (4249)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Razo,Armando
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 204
Topic Title: REAL POLITICS AROUND THE WORLD

Course Description:
This course has a dual purpose: to introduce students to political science and to show how political scientists compare and contrast different countries. Students will gain a basic understanding of the variety of political systems that different societies have established throughout history. We will pay particular attention to the economic consequences of different types of government to understand why some countries are rich and others are poor, but will also explore various other topics such as presidential and parliamentary democracies, dictatorships, political order and conflict, political participation, public policies, and social movements. Political theories will be illustrated with case readings and regular short films from selected countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Selected Topics * Theories of government and nation-states * The economic role of governments * Democratic and Nondemocratic regimes * New and Advanced Democracies * Postcommunist political development * Politics and economics of Developing countries * Violence and Political Disorder * Globalization

POLS-Y 109:INTRO TO INTL RELATIONS (4250)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 111

Course Description:
Poverty. Inequality. Scarce resources. Ethnic identity. Territorial ambitions. Ideology. Political aspirations. As we move into a new millennium, nearly every area of the world is beset by violent conflict arising from these and many other sources. This course will provide you with basic conceptual tools and information to help you understand some of the major problems in world politics in recent decades and think critically about possible solutions to those problems. The primary focus will be on the causes of conflict and war; the advantages and disadvantages of and alternatives to force for achieving foreign policy goals; and ways of preventing or reducing the likelihood, severity and duration of war. The course will include a simulation of the United Nations General Assembly in which all students will participate as delegates.

POLS-Y 109:INTRO TO INTL RELATIONS (9915)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 111

Course Description:
Poverty. Inequality. Scarce resources. Ethnic identity. Territorial ambitions. Ideology. Political aspirations. As we move into a new millennium, nearly every area of the world is beset by violent conflict arising from these and many other sources. This course will provide you with basic conceptual tools and information to help you understand some of the major problems in world politics in recent decades and think critically about possible solutions to those problems. The primary focus will be on the causes of conflict and war; the advantages and disadvantages of and alternatives to force for achieving foreign policy goals; and ways of preventing or reducing the likelihood, severity and duration of war. The course will include a simulation of the United Nations General Assembly in which all students will participate as delegates.

POLS-Y 200:CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL TOPICS (32903)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Smyth,Regina
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 344

Course Description:
Since 2010, political protests erupted in Cairo, London, the US, and Moscow, challenging regimes and changing public policy debates. While analysts have pointed to a moment of global protest, the details of each of these protest events suggests that there were significant differences in the source, form, and impact of individual movements. In this course, we will examine theories that explain protest activity in the age of globalization and social networking. We will ask the critical question of why individuals join protest movements even when it challenges their personal safety. Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion and in-class assignments and exercises. We will rely many types of evidence to evaluate protest movements, including scholarly and policy-articles, the popular press, memoirs, and film. The course is divided into four sections: an introduction, a study of the Arab Spring with a focus on Egypt, a study of post-Communist Color Revolutions with a focus on Russia, and a study far right activism.

POLS-Y 202:POLTCS & CITIZEN IN INFORM AGE (5469)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 205:ANALYZING POLITICS (4853)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Antony,Alexander Klein
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 204

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 211:INTRODUCTION TO LAW (7793)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Dalecki,Jacek
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 310

Course Description:
Law is defined as rules of conduct that govern a society. In a democratic society, law serves as a guarantee of governmental accountability and social rights. Specifically, law is intended to assure that no person or branch of government may rise above rules made by elected public officials, that the rights of citizens are protected from arbitrary use of power, and that rules of societal conduct are clear, fairly enforced, and guarantee predictability as to how a society functions. The expression "the rule of law" (or "everyone is subject to the law") is often used to encapsulate the essence of this set of principles. In brief, the rule of law is said to be a foundation for both order and liberties. We will examine this credo through three lenses. (1) Origins of law and formulations of the rule of law. How did law come about? How was the concept of the rule of law established and formalized? What are the main theories of law and the rule of law in circulation today? (2) The United States court system and its highest judicial authority, the Supreme Court. How is the court system organized? What is the relation between the courts on and between state and federal levels? What is the role of the Supreme Court in American politics? What factors affect decisions made by the Supreme Court Justices? (3) The international context of law. What is the relation between domestic and international law? Can principles of the rule of law govern relations among nation states? Is it possible to have a global system of law? The implicit goal of this course is also to reflect on a more pointed question: Is law neutral and objective or is law like a spider web through which the big flies pass and the little ones get caught?

POLS-Y 212:MAKING DEMOCRACY WORK (30756)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Bielasiak,Jacob
Day & Time: TR 9:00 AM - 11:35 AM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 347

Course Description:
What is democracy? Can any country become a democracy, or are certain preconditions necessary? Why do some democracies succeed, while others break down and return to dictatorial politics? Is democracy as an idea in crisis around the world? The course examines the principles and institutions of democracies around the world. We start with: what is democracy and democratization? We turn to preconditions ¿ are economic growth, or civic culture, or foreign influence necessary for democracy? Or can democracy be crafted from scratch in inhospitable situations? Next, we consider different institutional mechanisms: pluralism and consensus democracy, presidential and parliamentary governments, multi or two-party systems. We conclude by examining contemporary challenges to democracy, such as populism. Requirements include participation in class discussion, in-class written assignments, and two exams.

POLS-Y 212:MAKING DEMOCRACY WORK (10431)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Carugati,Maria Federica
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Wells Library 031

Course Description:
Today, almost every country proclaims to be a democracy, a republic, or both. However, democracy is also perceived to be at a juncture, as internal forces--for example, populism and nationalism--combine with external threats--like terrorism and the rise of powerful authoritarian leaders--to jeopardize its stability. Could studying the successes and failures of the first large-scale experiments in democratic and republican governance--ancient Athens and Rome--help us fix what is broken in our own political systems? In this course, students will analyze problems affecting democratic institutions by employing a long-term historical perspective and a design approach. The first half of the class confronts the fundamental challenge faced by non-authoritarian governments--the challenge of social cooperation at scale--and provides an introduction to the institutional structures of Athens' democracy and the Roman Republic. In the second half of the class, we use the insights that emerge from the ancient case studies to analyze, and craft potential solutions to a series of problems facing democracy today, such as inequality, corruption, violence, and exclusion. The goal of the class is to provide students with the instruments to approach contemporary governmental failures through the lenses of history, comparative politics, and political philosophy. The requirements for the course include: active participation, five quizzes, two exams, and a short research paper. Active participation means being able to summarize and discuss assigned readings and additional class material. The required readings are diverse and include newspaper articles, academic books and journals, and ancient historical and philosophical writings. Additional class material includes blog posts and movies. There are no books for purchase. The course has no prerequisites and students need no previous knowledge of either political science or ancient history. This course takes seriously the notion of "learning from the past," and it encourages students to think creatively about politics--as the ancients did.

POLS-Y 300:TOPICS IN CUR POL & GOVERNANCE (32901)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Grigorev,Ivan
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Law, Courts, and Constitutions in Authoritarian States This course explores the intersection of politics and law, with a focus on legal and judicial dynamics in contemporary autocracies. The course will address: the role of constitutions and courts in autocratic system, how courts function under democracy and autocracy, and the relative influence of different types of courts within these systems. While there is a strong expectation that authoritarianism is bad for law and courts, in this course we test these expectations by examining constitutions and courts in different autocratic states, including Russia. This exploration reveals a more complex picture of the role of legal institutions in autocracy than we might expect from the popular press.

POLS-Y 301:POL PARTIES & INTEREST GROUPS (4251)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 003

Course Description:
Political parties and interest groups, to many people, are like warts on the body politic. The writers of the Constitution felt pretty much the same way. They worried that these groups create conflicts and cause the gridlock that so often paralyzes government. So why, then, did these writers of the Constitution themselves create political parties shortly afterward? And why do most Americans consider themselves to be Democrats or Republicans and even consider the other party to be vile? In this course you'll come to understand what parties and interest groups are capable of doing to promote a democracy and what they actually do in practice. We'll look at third parties, political action committees, "dark money," and social movements as well. There will be a substantial amount of reading in this course. Two essay exams and several short research projects will be assigned.

POLS-Y 305:CONSTITUTNL RIGHTS & LIBERTIES (4252)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Failer,Judith L.
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 003

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 307:INDIANA STATE GOV & POLITICS (4253)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Byrne,Sean Joseph
Day & Time: M 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Building & Room Number: Bldg Not Assigned TBA

Course Description:
**class is for students interning with a party caucus in the legislature** The course will discuss and analyze the nature of Indiana politics and how it compares to national politics and the politics of other states. To do so, we will examine Indiana state government and politics in a comparative perspective. Among the topics we will cover include the structural institutions that shape our state's government and politics (including federalism, the state Constitution, and local government), the structure and functioning of each of our state government's three branches, other major players (extra-governmental) in the creation and implementation of our policies (including lobbyists, interest groups, and the media), and a few of the recurring policy issues that tend to dominate our political agenda (including the crafting of the budget, education, health and welfare, and morals legislation). For each of these topics, we will draw on literature in political science to provide a context in which to evaluate 1) how states ought to function in each of these arenas (on their own terms and in comparison to the national model); 2) how Indiana compares with other states; and 3) how well we believe Indiana meets the political ideal. Our class time will be divided into two parts: one to focus on the national, comparative, and theoretical context in which Indiana's government and politics operate; the other on how Indiana's government and politics fit into that context. Many weeks we will have guest speakers from all levels of Indiana government and politics who will help us work on the latter task.

POLS-Y 317:VOTING/ELECTNS/PUBLIC OPINION (30759)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Fraga,Bernard L.
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Democracy is generally understood to be the basis of the American political system, with elections serving as the primary link between citizens and the representation they receive. Yet many of us stay home on election day, casual observers decry partisan politics, and polling reveals few Americans feel well represented by Congress. In this course, we will explore features of American electoral politics through three central questions, each addressing the points made above: Why do we vote? What drives us to vote for one candidate over another? When do our political opinions impact public policy? While we will emphasize the many answers political science provides, we will also pay attention to the way campaigns perceive voters, and how data journalism and data analysis can help us understand election results. Most of the course will focus on recent presidential and congressional elections, including Donald Trump's election in 2016. The end goal of the course is to move beyond an us vs. them understanding of elections, and instead see how a scientific understanding of the electoral process can help explain the politics of today.

POLS-Y 318:THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (11476)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Badas,Alex
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
This course will analyze the origins, development, and operations of the American presidency. Topics will include presidential elections, the interaction between the President and Congress, the interaction between the President and the judiciary, Presidential policymaking, and the President's influence over public opinion. At the end of this course students will have a better appreciation and understanding of political science concepts, theories, and methodologies and be able to apply them to contemporary political events. Assignments: 3 exams, 4 article summaries, a 6-8 page research design.

POLS-Y 320:JUDICIAL POLITICS (8272)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Braman,Eileen
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Swain East 140

Course Description:
In this class we will be examine at the American judicial system. We will study the foundations of law and the many assumptions behind conceptions of judicial authority. We will delve into federal and state court organization, the selection of judges and the role of other players in the legal system. We will cover civil and criminal trial procedure as well as the various factors that influence judges' decision-making. Students should come away with a better understanding of how our court system operates and the philosophy underlying specific legal practices.

POLS-Y 321:THE MEDIA AND POLITICS (11471)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Cruz Nichols,Vanessa
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Edmund Burke asserts in The Sublime and The Beautiful, "No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear." Yet, the media and political mobilizers often seek to garner support and encourage participation by pointing to the looming catastrophe at hand, often triggering a sense of urgency. What kinds of dilemmas do constant fear tactics pose to the health of American democracy? This course examines the role of whistleblowers in American politics, with a critical lens on the political psychology behind persuasive (and potentially problematic) communication strategies exercised by the media and political elites. Topics vary and may include free speech, social movements, public opinion, identity politics, campaign tactics and the politics of representation. With a particular focus on race and ethnicity, we will examine the ways in which the media impact the civic engagement of groups in the United States as well as the policy outcomes of topics including immigration, healthcare, environmental, crime and elections. Students will practice interpreting data from recent surveys on social and political attitudes.

POLS-Y 333:CHINESE POLITICS (32905)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Yasuda,John Kojiro
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Wells Library 031

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 350:POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (6639)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Kastart,Wynand
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 347

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 350:POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (6496)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (6497)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (5477)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 362:INTL POLITICS SELECTED REGIONS (33897)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Magid,Yehuda
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 209

Course Description:
This course will examine conflict in the modern era through the lens of ethnicity. The course will introduce students to important concepts relating to ethnic conflict, a range of theories that have been developed to explain ethnic conflict, and the role of ethnicity in some of the most prominent crises faced by the international community today. Questions examined in this course will include: What makes a conflict "ethnic"? What are the underlying causes of ethnic conflicts? Why do some ethnic groups live peacefully together while others engage in horrific acts of violence against one another? What role has ethnicity played in the growth and spread of Islamist groups such as ISIS and al-Qaeda? What is the role of ethnicity in the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the conflicts in Ukraine and Chechnya? What role does ethnicity play in the ongoing conflict in Israel/Palestine? How has the international community responded to ethnic conflicts? In addition to focusing on foreign conflicts the course will also build on the recent events in Charlottesville to explore the role ethnicity plays in current political tensions within the United States.

POLS-Y 363:COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY (6501)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 367:INTERNATIONAL LAW (6502)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 368:RUSSIAN & SOVIET FOREIGN POL (10451)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
After decades of Cold War, for a while it seemed possible that the bitter enmity between Russia and the West might give way to an amicable partnership that could address many pressing world problems. Instead, Cold War tensions are resuming, and years of rivalry have left a legacy of mistrust and suspicion that seems increasingly unlikely to dissipate. This course will attempt to understand the reasons for this disappointing outcome. We will examine the evolution of Soviet foreign policy in the period since World War II and the foreign policy of Russia since the collapse of the Soviet state, focusing in particular on Russia's relations with the West. Tensions between Russia and the West with regard to developments in Eastern Europe, Central and East Asia, and the Middle East will also be considered. Topics may include the competing views on foreign policy held by various Russian elites, the persistent legacy of the Russian past and of Soviet experience in international affairs before 1945; the impact of ideology on Soviet and Russian decisions and actions; and the institutions and individuals involved in the making of Moscow's foreign policy. Readings, lectures and discussions will analyze Soviet conduct during the Cold War, the changes in Soviet policy that led to the end of the Cold War, and Russia's policies in the post-Cold War era. Students will participate in a role-playing exercise, simulating discussions in the Russian Foreign Ministry.

POLS-Y 375:WAR & INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT (8754)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Miliate,Brandon Joseph
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 242

Course Description:
War and other kinds of conflict are at the center of Political Science and International Relations, so much so that we have come up with so many explanations of this violent phenomenon that wrapping your mind around them all can seem daunting and perhaps even a bit pointless. At the same time, for most people explaining the causes of war is only helpful if it can inform conflict resolution, prevent future conflicts before they start, or further other political/societal goals. To that end, this course aims to make theory useful and pragmatic; offer students intelligent and sophisticated ways of speaking about real conflicts in the past, present, and future; and bring conflict resolution, peacekeeping, and policy making to the forefront.

POLS-Y 376:INTL POLITICAL ECONOMY (5481)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 379:ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY (9219)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Failer,Judith L.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 003

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 381:CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT (5482)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H GCC

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 382:MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT (6504)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Craiutu,Aurelian
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
We live in the age of Trump and alternative facts and must therefore reexamine some of the key concepts in political theory. One of them is leadership, the other one is constitutionalism, and the third one is democracy and free speech. Hence, this course will be organized around three main themes: I. What do we mean when we say that someone is a good or bad politician? What are the requirements of effective leadership in politics and public life? What is political power and how must power be exercised? Can we successfully combine ethical behavior with worldly success? Is compromise desirable in politics? How can we distinguish between opportunism and integrity in politics? II. What is necessary in order to have political order? What is constitutionalism and how can we best promote the principles of constitutionalism? Is there a "science of politics" or only "an art of politics" that varies with times and circumstances? III. What is democracy and what are its real virtues and limitations? Does it promote real freedom? Why do we care about democracy? Is this the best form of government? What is the relation between democracy and free speech? Is "true" democracy compatible with "political correctness"? The class will use a combination of lecture and discussion; hence, participation in class and online discussions along with regular attendance will be essential in calculating the final grade. The requirements include several quizzes, a midterm and final exam.

POLS-Y 384:DEV AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (4254)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: A&H

Instructor: Goldsmith,Zachary Robert
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 121

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 399:POLITICS OF THE UN (10458)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H GCC

Instructor: Spechler,Dina R.

Course Description:
Are you thinking about becoming a diplomat or an expert on international law? Are you hoping to study or work abroad? Do you have a strong interest in international affairs? This course will give you an opportunity to participate in a simulation of the United Nations General Assembly. Readings will focus on the origins and evolution of the UN; principal UN bodies, how they operate and what they do; who finances the UN; controversies and voting patterns in the UN; and UN activities and programs, such as peace keeping and peace enforcement, preventing weapons proliferation, facilitating economic development and promoting human rights. The centerpiece of the course will be the simulation. Participants will research and write several short papers, ranging in length from 3-8 pages each. Some of the papers will deal with the development, activities, authority and impact of the UN. The other papers will focus on the country the student will represent in the model UN. They will analyze that country's major foreign policy concerns, its principal economic and social problems and the chief regional or international issues that affect it. Students will also be asked to write two resolutions which their country might wish to submit for consideration by the UN General Assembly and to prepare written comments on the resolutions submitted by other participants in the simulation. There will be one or two short quizzes, but no examinations. The meeting time will be arranged to accommodate student schedules as well as possible. Interested students should contact the professor as soon as possible in the fall semester (spechler@indiana.edu).

POLS-Y 401:STUDIES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (32503)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Bovingdon,Gardner
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 235
Topic Title: POLITICS OF IDENTITY

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 405:MODELS&THEORIES POL DEC MAKING (13170)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Instructor: Razo,Armando
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 235

Course Description:
Politics is driven by the decisions of individuals and groups in society. The types of decisions that are made in any society range from individual choices such as deciding whom to support in a given election, to the collective choice of public policies made by a group of public officials. This course introduces students to basic tools and models of rational choice and game theory to understand political decision making. We start with a basic theory of how individuals make their own decisions. We will also explore the consequences of strategic behavior that arises when individuals interact or compete with other political actors. To that effect, we build upon the basic theory of individual choice to examine the complexities that arise when groups of people come together to make a decision. To understand group decision making, we will study how institutions, or the political context in which group decisions are made, affect group choices. This course provides students with an accessible, yet rigorous, introduction to modern theories of political decision making to accomplish three general goals. First, students will learn concept and tools that will allow them to re-examine and integrate material from previous courses within a common analytical framework. Second, by learning to analyze political problems in a logical and abstract way, students will be better prepared for more advanced courses in political science and other social sciences. Finally, the tools developed in this course have many practical applications for everyday decision making including various domains outside of political science such as business and economics.

POLS-Y 407:PROBLEMS IN COMPARTVE POLITICS (6505)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: S&H

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (5680)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Craiutu,Aurelian
Day & Time: W 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Cedar Hall C107
Topic Title: SENIOR SEMINAR

Course Description:
AMERICA SEEN THROUGH FOREIGN EYES JUSTIFICATION. Over the past two centuries, visitors of the New World saw America as a prospect, a country whose historical development foreshadowed the fate of modern industrial society. The institutions of the United States have always been considered to be a matter of more general interest than those of other nations in the world. One of the best guides to America can be found in Tocqueville's classic Democracy in America. Regardless of what we may come to think today about the virtues and limitations of this masterpiece, Tocqueville's book can still serve as a valuable starting point for exploring how foreign visitors have understood America, its institutions, society, and culture. On the one hand, it should not be forgotten that the greatest symbol of America, the widely celebrated Statue of Liberty, was the work of a few Frenchmen. On the other had, as James Russell Lowell once said, "for some reason or other, the European has rarely been able to see America except in caricature." Even if in America they saw more than America itself, as Tocqueville once acknowledged, their views on the institutions and manners of the New World are still worth exploring and comparing, and can enrich our understanding of liberal democracy. OBJECT OF THE COURSE. In this course, we shall explore a few classic works written by foreign thinkers about America. The central issue will be the "rhetoric of America," the question of American exceptionalism, and the roots of anti-Americanism. Is America the complete incarnation of the ideas of the Enlightenment, a "postmodern" ideal situated beyond history, a source of spiritual decadence that threatens the European tradition? Or is it a source of rejuvenation for the rest of the world? Why are some people inclined to espouse various forms of anti-Americanism? The requirements include a reading log, two individual written assignments, one group project, and a take-home exam.

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (5681)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Winecoff,William Kindred
Day & Time: T 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218
Topic Title: SENIOR SEMINAR

Course Description:
The Political Economy of Global Inequality This senior seminar offers an opportunity to survey the empirical and theoretical literature on the political economy of global inequality. Concern over the growth of inequality within many advanced and developing societies has placed the issue of economic distribution at the forefront of many political debates. At the same time, it appears that inequality between societies may have decreased in recent times, mostly due to rapid growth in populous emerging countries such as China and India. As this seminar progresses, we will explore the different ways of conceptualizing and measuring inequality, will consider the effects of inequality on economic and political systems, and will debate the policy options available for combatting inequality and/or dealing with its effects.

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (5682)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: DeSante,Christopher David
Day & Time: R 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Ballantine Hall 335
Topic Title: SENIOR SEMINAR

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 490:SENIOR SEM IN POLIT SCIENCE (9664)

Credit Hours: 3.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Loyle,Cyanne
Day & Time: M 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Woodburn Hall 218

Course Description:
Human Rights and Transitional Justice. Over the last thirty years we have seen a rapid increase in the push for accountability following political transitions and violent conflict as a means of reckoning with gross violations of individual human rights. Including the trials at Nuremberg and Tokyo, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the creation of the International Criminal Court, these processes, called transitional justice, have become a prominent way for dealing with violence and its legacy in the 21st Century. This seminar is designed as a survey of the existing transitional justice options following armed conflict. In addition to cataloguing the range of different mechanisms that can and have been used to address human rights violations, we will discuss the main debates and obstacles surrounding their use.

POLS-Y 496:FOREIGN STUDY IN POLITICAL SCI (4256)

Credit Hours: 3.0 - 8.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Hershey,Marjorie R.

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 499:HONORS THESIS (4257)

Credit Hours: 1.0 | CASE Requirement: IW

Instructor: Wright,Gerald C.
Day & Time: W 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Building & Room Number: Lindley Hall 019

Course Description:
Description Not Available

POLS-Y 499:HONORS THESIS (30770)

Credit Hours: 1.0 - 8.0 | CASE Requirement: None

Instructor: Wright,Gerald C.

Course Description:
Description Not Available